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Brunson, Alfred, 1793-1882 / Northern Wiskonsan
(1843)

Communication from Mr. Brunson,   pp. [3]-16 PDF (2.3 MB)


Page 14


14
ty.one inches long. They vary from the Lake trout in form and
flesh, so as to distinguish them.
  La Pointe, a place of the most importance on this Lake, is situ.
ated on the south east end of Magdaline Island. The Island is
twelve miles in length, and thirty in circumference. The soil
on it is poor, being a stiff red clay, upon a red sand rock. The
settlement was first formed about 100 years since, by the French
traders, and has slowly, but gradually increased, by the settle.
ment of voyagers, traders, &c. who took wives of the daughters
of the land: and by their half breed descendants, and some Indi.
ans who have adopted civilized habits. In 1834 it was made
the principal depot of the American Fur Company, and since
then, the Cleveland Company made an establishment there for
the purpose offishing and trading. Tho whole population com.
posed of whites, mixed bloods and civilized Indians, amounts to
nearly 500. The A. B. C. F. M. has a successful mission, and
a church here. The Catholics have a church, and these, with
the stores of the Fur Companies and other buildings give the
place quite the appearance and business of a town. Each of
the companies have a vessel which plies upon the Lake during
the season of navigation, the business of which has been increas.
ed in the past season, by the operations of the copper miners. In
the vicinity of La Pointe is a group of twenty.two islands on sev.
eral of which virgin copper has been found.
  For several years past the Fur Companies at this place, have
carried on an extensive business by fishing. But this, as a mat.
ter of commerce, is, for the present, at an end. The hard times
so affected their sales and reduced the price, that it became a loos.
iDg eoncerDn and has been abandoned. This unhappy change has
thrown several hundred people out of employ, who derived their
supDolt therefrom, and as the fur trade is rapidly declining and the
number of voyagers and laborers required consequently lessened,
almost the entire population are reduced to abject want. Some


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