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Brunson, Alfred, 1793-1882 / Northern Wiskonsan
(1843)

Communication from Mr. Brunson,   pp. [3]-16 PDF (2.3 MB)


Page 4


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miles. I also coasted the Lalic up and down, ouer 100 miles,
being nearly th- .i ulf  tent O. the souitli shorc or that inland
se% vhich comes witlin tljia- '(rritorv.  And in returning t
this place I ascendt3d the Lake-the St. Louis and Savannah riv-
ers; portage(l onvr to tbe M1ississippi and descended that river,
making the distance about 1000 miles.
   The entire country sou th of Lake Superior is now ceded to
 the United States. and open to settlement, and believing it of
 great public service to hiue a roal opened through it, not only to
 fitcilitate it, st ttcn cnt, hut also to connect those settlements al.
 ready made on the principal rivers, and to open a direct con.
 inunication by the nearest and best route between the lead and
 Copper mines within our limits I consented to guide the enter.
 prising company, before mentioned, in their arduous undertaking.
    rcc ox wagons with nine yoke of cattle, three horses, and
Jourtef n nLic, in all, composed the company.  We had with us
tents. provisions, axcs and other tools necessary to cut our wa'
through the wilderness.
   In leaving this place we ascended the bluffs, and took the di
viding rid gc t cen the wvnters of the Mississippi and the Wis
honsan. On this ie continued about eighty miles, over as good
natural ground fiir a road, as that leading from Fort Crawford
to Winnebago, througrh G(rant. Iowa and Dane counties. And
from this main ridge a spur of it runs to thr Falls of Black river,
between two of its branches; making the distance fIrom this
place to those falls about 100 miles, and over an en'ire ridge,
not divided by a sing!e stream of water.  It is true, for the want
of a perfect knowlcdge ol the country we missed the ridge lead.
ing to Black river fills, and spent ten days in one of the most
dismal pine and tinierack swamps that teams ever undertook to
pass, when we afterwards discovered we might have travelled
the distance on dry land in two days.
  The country thus far is broken on each side of the ridge, and
S


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