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Northern Wisconsin Agricultural and Mechanical Association / Transactions of the Northern Wisconsin Agricultural and Mechanical Association, including a full report of the industrial convention held at Neenah, Wisconsin, February, 1886. Together with proceedings of the Association for 1884, to January 1, '86
Vol. XI (1886)

Bright, C. M.
Taxation,   pp. 273-306 PDF (6.8 MB)


Page 302


302   TRANSACTIONS OF THE NORTHERN WISCONSIN
Mr. Hazen - As long as the government stands and is a
government, we hold our lands by virtue of that govern-
ment, the government we are supporting and maintaining
and fighting for.
Mr. Winslow - At the present time I am paying rent on a
piece of land. I am debating in my mind whether I would
not do better to go and buy a piece of land, running in debt
for it and paying interest on the money, which amounts to
about the same thing. I do not see the particular difference
whether one duke pays the rent of a hundred thousand
acres or whether he pays the rent of ten to raise crops on.
If he has got the money and rents the land, it is his. We
have got to pay our rent every year whether we own the
land or rent it to somebody else. I notice the tax-payers say
I have come to pay my rent. They have to pay rent the
same as Mr. Hazen *does. It is about as broad as it is long.
We have a goodly number of farmers here. Most every
farmer keeps some cows and stock of different kinds. I am
a dairyman and a stock farmer. In my first experience in
farming in Wisconsin we had no railroads to get the
grain to market. It frequently cost more than enough
to eat up the profit. My first idea was to look about and
see what I could produce on the farm and pay the transpor-
tation, that I could get into the market and have a little
something left for producing it. I stocked my farm with
cows in 1850. From that time I have run a stock farm, kept
what stock I could on the farm. Many of our farmers in
an early day, I think made a mistake in raising wheat.
Wheat was the principal crop until the farms became ex-
hausted, and the farmers were driven to some other crop-
As I am a dairyman I might perhaps talk a little about the
dairy cow. Dairy products have been very low the last
season. You have cheese factories among you. The price
is so low it is almost impossible to pay expenses. What to
do in such a case as that is the query with the dairymen.
We have got to take what we can get. We cannot make
the markets. We can make as good an article as we can.
The better the article, the better the price, and the more
readily the sale. If a man keeps a dairy, the first thing he


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