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Northern Wisconsin Agricultural and Mechanical Association / Transactions of the Northern Wisconsin Agricultural and Mechanical Association, including a full report of the industrial convention held at Neenah, Wisconsin, February, 1886. Together with proceedings of the Association for 1884, to January 1, '86
Vol. XI (1886)

Bright, C. M.
Taxation,   pp. 273-306 PDF (6.8 MB)


Page 292


292   TRANSACTIONS OF THE NORTHERN WISCONSIN
DISCUSSION.
Mr. Roe - I would say as a phenomenon or specimen of
political economy that the paper just read is a very inter-
esting paper to us. The gentleman says that those who
believe in protection may be divided into three classes -
those who are interested in being protected, who see money
in it; those who have political capital in advocating protec-
tion, and those who shout protection because they are taught
to. That reminds me of the old saying, there is orthodoxy,
my doxy, heterodoxy, your doxy. That is a very easy
way to get over this mattor. There are a few facts I would
like explained in this gentleman's paper with regard to free
trade and protection. Take the condition of England
to-day. The political economists and stat esmen of England
are brought face to face with the social and political econ-
omy problem. They are compelled to meet it in some form.
It is shown in the depreciation of its business interests and
the trouble deepening and widening among the masses, as
shown in the recent riots or threatened riots, for they hardly
reached the actual point of bloodshed on the streets of
London. There is growing up in every part of England,
among the English thinkers, the idea of a protective tariff,
to be increased year after year until finally they will be able
to raise their voice over the entire kingdom, and the point
they make, and they make a very able showing of figures, is
that the present ruinous condition of every industry of
England is the result of free trade. That is the situation of
England to-day. Free trade England! That is the outcome.
I am not prepared to charge the whole of this on free trade.
I believe there are other agencies at work to the detriment
of England. The bad harvests that they have had for a
term of years undoubtedly has swept away vast amounts of
capital. The collisions between labor and capital, owing to
the combinations on one side and lock-outs on the other,
have dislocated manufactures and trade, and other currents
which we have not the time now to take the measure of.
That is the condition of free trade England. Now we will
go north of us. What is the condition of things in Canada?


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