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Northern Wisconsin Agricultural and Mechanical Association / Transactions of the Northern Wisconsin Agricultural and Mechanical Association, including a full report of the industrial convention held at Neenah, Wisconsin, February, 1886. Together with proceedings of the Association for 1884, to January 1, '86
Vol. XI (1886)

[How about the growth of calves],   pp. 269-273 PDF (968.4 KB)


Bright, C. M.
Taxation,   pp. 273-306 PDF (6.8 MB)


Page 273


AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL ASSOCIATION.  273
Judgment tells a man cold milk is not the thing for the
stomach. With a calf tied in a fence corner with its legs
all covered with flies common sense shows that it does not
pay. You cannot cheat nature or the Almighty. When the
flies bother, put them in. Use calf sense in raising them.
Mr. Gillett -Of course your opinion is to keep them in
when the flies bother them and let them out when the flies
are not troubling them.
Prof. Henry-The statement was made in Baraboo last week,
by a Short Horn grower, that Wisconsin cattle stood lower
in the Chicago market than Texas steers. If that is true, I
believe it is time we begun to study how to take care of
cattle.
A paper was then read by C. M. Bright of Oshkosh, en-
titled.
TAXATION.
By C. M. BRIGHT, Oshkosh.
There is an ancient and familiar story about an honest
farmer who had been for years in the habit of sending his
boy on horseback to mill, with a bushel of wheat in one end
of a bag and sixty pounds of rock in the other to balance
it. The horse had thus to carry sixty pounds of wheat,
sixty pounds of rock, and the boy. One day an ingenious
neighbor showed the farmer how he might divide the grist
and leave the rock out. This story is something of a joke
on the farmer, but considered as an illustration, such as
suits the purpose of its present use, it is not much of a joke
after all.
The human race progresses, but by the slowest and cost-
liest methods. History has been defined as the record of
human progress. It has been made by the efforts the race
has been engaged in, through oppression and bloodshed and
suffering, to better its condition by enlarging its liberties,
and relieving itself of unjust and unnecessary burdens.
Some burdens must be borne. It was necessary for the
18-N. A.


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