University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The State of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Northern Wisconsin Agricultural and Mechanical Association / Transactions of the Northern Wisconsin Agricultural and Mechanical Association, including a full report of the industrial convention held at Neenah, Wisconsin, February, 1886. Together with proceedings of the Association for 1884, to January 1, '86
Vol. XI (1886)

Henry, W. A.
Cornstalks compared with mixed hay and clover hay, for producing milk and butter,   pp. 245-262 PDF (3.3 MB)


Page 245


AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL AssOCIATION.  245
CORN-STALKS COMPARED WITH MIXED HAY AND
CLOVER HAY FOR PRODUCING MILK AND
BUTTER.
Prof. W. A. HENRY, of the Wisconsin Agricultural Experiment Station,
Madison.
The following described experiments were conducted to
ascertain:
1st. The relative values of corn fodder and mixed hay for
producing milk and butter.
2d. The relative values of corn fodder and clover hay for
producing milk and butter.
3d. The amount of milk and butter an acre of corn will
make when fed to milch cows.
4th. The value of an acre of corn when turned into milk
and butter.
All the materials fed were good of their kind, the corn-
stalks being from a lot described further on, cut early, and
well cured in the shock and bound into bundles, after husk-
ing the fully matured ears. The mixed hay was about one-
third clover and two-thirds timothy. The clover hay was
from medium red clover, cut early enough to preserve the
leaves and heads in good condition. The corn-meal was
from Kansas corn, thoroughly dried and ground fine. The
bran was Minneapolis new process.
The hay and fodder were fed long, thus necessitating
much waste with the corn-stalks, which might have been
avoided by running the stalks through a cutter, but as this
was a preliminary trial, it was deemed best to take each
fodder in its simplest form, leaving other tests to show us
the loss by feeding in this way.
Four excellent butter cows were selected and divided into
two lots of two each, of equal capacity for producing milk
and butter as near as we could judge. During the trials
they held their weights and maintained their appetites so
well that no further mention need be made of these points.
In every trial a week's preliminary feeding preceded the
two weeks of actual test, this time being considered neces-


Go up to Top of Page