University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The State of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Ho-nee-um trail in the fall

[Printed script of introduction and fall tour],   pp. 14-29


Page 24

 
41 
    . or a larger one using the log for food. 
    Because of the edible food association we 
    prefer the children learn the term fungi- 
    rather than mushroom. Fungi are non-flowering, 
    non-green plants and include mushrooms. 
    Any distinction between "mushroom" and 
    "toadstool" is hazy and artificial. Some label 
    toadstools as poisonous; mushrooms edible. 
    Unless one is a real expert, fungi should not be 
    picked for eating! The fungi using the log for 
    food are aiding in the process of decay. 
    Through decay nutrients in the log will be 
    returned to the soil where they will perhaps 
    be used by a new tree. 
42 
Insects live in the old logs, but you may have to look 
closely to see them. 
    Carpenter ants have been at work on this 
    portion of the log. The amount of sawdust is 
    evidence of their industriousness. 
43 
In the fall, as we leave the woods and enter the marsh, 
we find ragweed growing taller than our heads. 
44 
The pencil points to the seeds of this fast growing 
marsh plant -- the giant ragweed. 
24 


Go up to Top of Page