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Simmons second century

A story of materials and machines


A story of markets


a daily single-shift capacity of nearly
20,000 mattresses, which makes us
far and away the biggest mattress
manufacturer in the world. And the
same plants have a simultaneous
daily single-shift capacity of about
1400 Hide-A-Bed sofas.
All this production muscle is
backed up bya unique Simmons
institution-our National
Technological Center in Munster,
Indiana. The "NTC" operates its
own building, with offices,
laboratories and experimental
shops. It is responsible for plant
layouts and production methods
and processes. It issues and
supervises our national
specifications for all merchandise,
and our standards of quality control.
It is responsible for equipment
At the NTC,
we never stop testing.
procurement and maintenance
standards. It supervises and
coordinates incentive rates. Finally,
the NTC keeps up a constant study
of competitive merchandise, to make
sure of our continuing product
superiority.
This year our bedding plants will
turn out five million units. Naturally,
there is bound to be an occasional
lapse in poor workmanship, or
materials. But how rarely! Our
quality control is the most rigorous
in the industry. We believe our
product quality at this very high level
of production is a truly magnificent
achievement.
a story of
markets
From the start, we have been sales
oriented. Profoundly so. Marketing
considerations have always come
first because, without healthy sales,
we cannot do anything for ourselves,
our people, our stockholders, or our
customers.
Our story of marketing is a story
of many successes and-let us face
it-a few failures. Over the years we
have made every kind of marketing
mistake you could think of, and we
learned from each one.
Some of our more magnificent
mistakes resulted from mass
marketing products that only worked
in the laboratory, and then with
materials that were too costly for the
assembly line. An early example
was the Simmons Hydra Vacuum
Cleaner that worked-but often did
not work-off your kitchen faucet.


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