University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The State of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

McLeod, Donald / History of Wiskonsan, from its first discovery to the present period, including a geological and topographical description of the territory with a correct catalogue of all its plants
(1846)

Chapter XIV,   pp. 235-254 PDF (3.3 MB)


Page 239


239
HISTORY OF WISKONSAN.
and is therefore called Heart prairie; and another,
from its form, is denominated Round prairie. In- this
county there are three grist and six saw mills. The
settlers are from different countries, but chiefly from
the eastern states. Peace, plenty and contentment,
reign in-every family in this favored country. If there
are any people in the world, that can enjoy themselves
with the fruit of their labor, it is the people of Wis-
konsan. The earth, when properly subdued and tilled,
yields bountifully. The climate is proverbially healthy.
Any man that labors but four hours a day, regularly,
during the spring, summer, and autunm months, may
depend on becoming rich and independent in a few
years.
   Geneva, is another flourishing village in this county.
It is situated at the outlet of that beautiful body of
water, lake Geneva. This outlet affords excellent
water power, and cannot fail, if properly improved, to
render Geneva a place of importance. The first im-
provement made here, in 1838, was the construction
of a grist mill. In 1842, it numbered about eighty
buildings-several stores, three taverns, and numerous
mechanic shops, and continues to increase in business
and importance. The population in 1842 amounted
to eleven hundred and forty-five, being one fourth of
the whole population of the county.
   Delevan, is a post town, situated in the township of
 Delevan. Turtle lake is in this township. It is nearly
 equally divided into timber and prairie land,-the
 prairie occupying the northern portion. The popula-
 tion in 1842, was two hundred and eighty-nine.
    The township of Richmond contains several small


Go up to Top of Page