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McLeod, Donald / History of Wiskonsan, from its first discovery to the present period, including a geological and topographical description of the territory with a correct catalogue of all its plants
(1846)

Chapter XIV,   pp. 235-254 PDF (3.3 MB)


Page 236


HISTORY OF WISKONSAN.
would thrive well here. It is eminently calculated for
pastoral purposes, and highly deserving the attention
of wool-growers. When the Pekatonica and Rock
rivers are rendered navigable, this will become one of
the most important of the interior counties. on account
of its agricultural and grazing facilities, as well as its
mineral productions. Like the other counties of this
territory, the population is composed of all sorts,-but
the native American is the most numerous. All live
together in peace and harmony, and are emulous only
in accumulating property, by honest industry, and in
kind offices to each other. Throughout the territory,
the emigrant and strant'er is qnre to meet with the
kindest reception and treatment. Wherever he lo-
cates, the citizens turn out to assist him in building a
log cabin, and generally instruct him the best and most
convenient method of breaking up and tilling the
ground. Should the emigrant be poor, if he be honest
and industrious, the neighborhood contributes and as-
sists him along, until he is able to provide for himself.
The people of Wiskonsan are remarkable for their
hospitality and kindness to strangers. The hand .of
man, here, has joined with the hand of nature, to wel-
come the settler, and encourage him on. The tenden-
cy of the liberal institutions of this highly favored
republic, to harmonise into one great political and
social body, the discordant prejudices and political
creeds of Europeans, who are continual pouring ipto
the great republican mass, is certainly, to say the least,
very remarkable, and speaks highly for the wisdom of
those departed sages, who framed the American Con-
stitution, and moulded its government, Here the old
236


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