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Broehm, Barbara / World War II through the eyes of Manitowoc's homefront youth
(December 2000)

World War II through the eyes of Manitowoc's homefront youth,   pp. [1]-30


Page 30

Broehm 30 
men only 300 survived and my cousin was one of them. For five days he floated
out at 
sea before being rescued." 113 
"It isn't until now," Howard notes, "that Melvin is willing
to talk about the war.. 
some of the situations he faced were horrifying." Howard adds, "On
the homefront, we 
knew very little of what was going on. We didn't understand the atomic bomb,
we knew 
nothing of the Holocaust and very little of the Japanese internment going
on in this 
country."'114 Art comments, "It took me years to get over my feelings
toward the 
Japanese... we were trained to hate them."'115 
On the other hand, homefront children warmly recall the patriotism and national
unity. "No matter what our personal problems were, the war brought us
together.. .there 
was a sense of unity. We had a goal--victory." Susan adds, "I also
lived during the 
depression, and the war pulled us out of that. After the war, my parents
were able to buy 
a house. Before the war, this was only something they could dream of''16
"I can't forget those young men who fought for our country," comments
Lorraine. 
"Two of my very dear friends were killed in World War II, and I will
never forget them." 
She adds, "World War II was a special time in history... and we have
never been quite 
the same since."'"7 
113 Howard Schmill, interview by Barbara Broehm. 
114 Howard Schmill, interview by Barbara Broehm. 
115 Arthur Nickels, interview by Barbara Broehm. 
116 Susan Dick, interview by Barbara Broehm. 
17 Lorraine Schuette, interview by Barbara, 22 November, 2000. 


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