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Town of Frankfort centennial
(1890-1990)

Businesses,   pp. 111-119


Page 115

John Busche moved to the Town of Frankfort in 1974. In
addition to farming, he does back hoe work for water lines, septic
and holding tanks.
Leffel Manufacturing
Darrel Leffel established a barn equipment welding busi-
ness on his farm, in Section 34, in 1977. He built a new metal
building, in 1978, where he makes up all types of partitions and
stanchions.
Livestock
Ferdinand Holubetz drove a team of horses and a wagon,
with an enclosed hutch, buying calves from local farmers, in the
late teens and early 1920's. He butchered the calves, dressed
them out and shipped them to Madison and Chicago veal
markets.
Loddie Loskot operated a livestock, poultry and egg busi-
ness, from 1932 until 1959, on his farm in Section 10. The calves
were sold to the Edgar Packing Co. and the eggs were trucked
to be sold in Chicago.
Arnold Bauman started raising poultry and eggs on his farm
in Section 24, in 1935. In 1943, he started shipping eggs to the
New York Market. He expanded his business by buying eggs
locally and from as far as Minnesota and Iowa. He, also,
expanded his markets and trucked eggs to Chicago, Northern
Wisconsin and Michigan. He built a packing plant on his farm
in 1948. In 1954, his peak year, he was handling up to 1500 cases
of eggs a day, with almost 50 employees working at candling and
packing eggs, which were then inspected by a Federal Inspector.
A partial list of employees were: Mildred Panzigrau, Char-
lotte Borchardt, Mrs. Arnold Punks, Mrs. Lester Bauman, Mrs.
Art Lueschow, Mrs. Melda Vold, Mrs. Elfreda Hoernke, Mrs.
Marion Van Dreel, Mrs. Bernard Leffel, Mrs. Leona Jecke, Mrs.
Lorna Schmelzer, Mrs. Adell Jeske and many more. Arnold
continued the operation until 1959, when his packing plant
burned down and was never rebuilt. Later, he sold his farm and
moved, first to Mondovi, then to Chippewa Falls. There he
developed a Pole Building Construction Company.
Otto Hoernke's
Turkey Farm
This was started in the Town of Frankfort around 1935 by
Otto Hoernke. He got the idea from his brother Alvin who lived
in Minnesota since 1920. Several other farmers followed in this
endeavor shortly after. Ernest Hoernke, Herbert Passeh],
Herman Hoernke, William Hoernke, Herman Christiansen,
Bill Thomas and Harvey Bohman.
Otto Hoernke and his brother-in-law Fred Klumb were the
largest of the turkey operations, raising about 10,000 turkeys
per season. They not only processed and sold their own turkeys
but also processed and sold turkeys for the other farmers in the
township. Their total operation was probably in excess of
13,000. It was conducted on the Otto Hoernke farm in Section
22 SW SE. The business lasted until around 1950 when it
became unprofitable to stay in business.
Photography
Charles Brown was a professional photographer, having
operated a photography studio in Athens, in 1893. He moved to
the Town of Frankfort, in 1894, where he continued his profes-
sion for manyyears, taking pictures in the community and in the
out-lying areas. He used the older style of camera, which had
glass negatives. Unfortunately, most of the old negatives he had
taken have been ruined due to exposure to the elements.
Frank Bobert did photography work during his lifetime, in
the Town of Frankfort. He was the son of John Bobert. Frank's
son, Donald, has his father's collection of pictures.
Daniel Wirkus was a teacher, who pursued photography
during his spare time, taking pictures in Frankfort and the
surrounding areas. Many of his pictures remain, identified with
his name. His father was Joe Wirkus, Sr.
Trucking
Ferdinand Totzke, of Section 13, trucked livestock to the
Stratford Shipping Association from 1924 to 1940, when the
state began to raise license fees and other taxes. He drove a 1924
International truck.
Elmerd Schemenauer
Ernest Hoernke Turkeys
Elmerd Schemenauer started hauling milk with horses,
wagon and sleigh at the age of 14, while living in the Town of
Johnson. He moved to the Town of Frankfort, in 1930. He was
one of the first to start hauling milk to the Laabs Cheese
Factory, later known as Kraft Foods, in Milan. He continued
hauling milk for about 15 years.


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