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Trenk, Fred B. (Fred Benjamin), 1900- / Forest planting handbook
(1932)

The best plantation for local conditions,   pp. 17-28 PDF (3.2 MB)


Page 19


ing use for trees planted on these soils, although the better types of
sand may be used for growing white and Norway pines for lumber.
- Because these sand soils vary so widely in fertility, water level, and
degree of fineness of sand, several species of trees can be recommend-
ed. In the light sand areas and on recently eroded sand, such as are
found among thie sand hills of Monroe, Jackson, Juneau, Adams, and
adjacent counties, Norway and jack pines are recommended for plant-
    The same area as shown on preceding page taken five years later,
  indicating how pines checked sand drifting.
ing. A few Scdtch pine plantations in this district have made as
rapid a growth as jack pine, and when the seed was secured from
northern Europe, the trees were straighter than jack pine. The full
possibilities of Scotch pine in the United States have not been deter-
mined, but the experimental plantings on light sand already made
appear promising.
  On somewhat heavier glacial sands, such as are found in Oneida,
Vilas, Wasburn, and -Douglas counties, white pine, Norway pine, and
Norway and white spruce have been planted with good results. The
pines will produce saw logs and the spruce is particularly valuable for
pulpwood.
  This type requires no unusual planting methods. Wide, shallow fur-
rows should be plowed, and a six by six-foot spacing is recommended
where little or no tree growth is present. Scrub oak brush must be
destroyed, especially near the planted trees. Where there is a scat-
tered growth of pine and hardwood trees not exceeding 600 per acre,
an eight by eight-foot spacing is satisfactory. This advance tree
growth, even though it may be of low value, will serve to fill in around
' 19


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