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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XL ([covers January 1961/December 1961])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XL, no. 6,   pp. [1]-8 PDF (3.9 MB)


Page 2


2        (22)
WISCONSIN CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
State's Milk Production
Shows Seasonal Rise
Milk production on Wisconsin farms
rose seasonally from April to May but
showed no change from May last
year. The 1,820 million pounds of milk
produced by the state's dairy herds
was 4 percent above the 10-year aver-
age for the month.
So far this year, milk production
on the state's farms is estimated at
8,084 million pounds and also shows
no change from the quantity produced
during the January through May pe-
riod last year. With no change in the
cost of a typical Wisconsin dairy ra-
tion compared with May last year and
a 5 percent gain in milk plrices, farm-
ers were able to buy more feed with
the milk dollar in May. And by the
end of the month they were feeding a
slightly larger dairy ration than a
year ago.
For the nation, milk production on
farms in May is estimated at 12,278
million pounds and for the first five
months at 5:3,529 million pounds. Milk
production estimates for both May
and the first five months show in-
creases over a year ago of less than
1 percent.
Farm Product Price
Index Up Slightly
Wisconsij'ss index of prices received
for pro(luctS sold by farmers in May
dhopped seasonally from April but
was up 1 percent from May last year
as a result of higher milk prices off-
setting decreases in the prices of'
many other farm commodities.
Prices received for milk sold by
Wisconsin farmers in Mlay are ex-
pected to average $3.40 a hundred
pounds of milk of average test. This
price is 15 cents above May last year
and the highest for the month since
1952. The May milk price shows a
seasonal drop of 4 cents from April.
While prices received fior hogs sold
by Wisconsin farmers averaged $15.80
a hundredweight in May or nearly a
dollar more than a year ago, prices
of other meat animals were lower.
And the index of meat animal prices
was off 1 percent froni May last year.
The index of poultry prices dropped
nearly 4 percent from April to May
and was off 16 percent from May last
year. Chicken prices in Mlay averaged
15 cents a pound compared with the
.-year average for the month of 19
cents. The index of egg prices dropped
1 pelrcent from April and was 2 per-
cent below May last year with prices
averaging 29 cents a dozen.
Wisconsin's index of prices received
by farmers was 249 percent of the
1910-14 average compared with 300
percent for the index of prices paid
by farmers in May. The index of
pfrces received rose I percent fromt
Mlay last year but the index of prices
paid was unchanged. This resulted il
the index of purchasing power of'
farm products showing a gain of I
percent. This ratio of prices received
to prices paid was only 83 percent of
the 1910-14 average.
Half of Milk Cows
3 to 5 Years Old
Half of the milk cows on farms of
Wisconsin dairy correspondents are
from three to five years of age ac-
cording to a recent survey. The pro-
portion of milk cows now in this age
group is about 11 percent greater
than indicated in a similar survey on
age of milk cows made in 1955.
Offsetting the gain in the propor-
tion of milk cows three to five years
of age were decreases in the propor-
tions of milk cows under three years
and over seven years of age. Of the
milk cows on farms of the state's
dairy reporters this spring, 16 percent
were under three years of age. The
proportion of cows in this age group
has dropped 16 percent since 1955.
Twelve percent of the cows in dairy
herds this spring were over seven
years of age. The proportion of the
cows in this group was a fourth
smaller than in 1955.
There are more milk cows three
and four years of age on farms of
Wisconsin dairy correspondents than
District
Northwest
North
Northeast
West
Central
East
Southwest
South
Southeast
State
Under      3 and
3 years I 4 years
17
16
is
18
16
18
15
17
is
16
34
32
33
35
35
33
35
34
35
34
I As reported by) Wisconsinl dairy corresponldenits
More Pheasants Seen
In State This Spring
There are more pheasants on Wis-
consin farms than a year -ago.
A count of pheasants by the state's
crop and dairy correspondents in
April indicated the number of birds
averaged 53 per ten farms compared
with the average of 44 birds shown
in the survey made in the spring of
1960. Pheasant numbers reported this
year averaged 16 roosters and 37 hens
per ten farms of crop 'and dairy cor-
respondents. The count also shows a
somewhat larger percentage of hens
in the total than last year when there
were 14 roosters and 30 hens per ten
farms.
The distribution of the pheasant
population appears to be comparable
with a year ago with the largest
number of pheasants in the southern
third of the state and the smallest
number in the northern third. The
number of Pheasants counted in the
southeastern counties averaged 94
birds per ten farms compared with
only 7 birds in the north-central coun-
ties.
Crop and dairy correspondents were
reported for any other age group. The
number of cows in this age group ac-
count for more than a third of the
total. According to the recent survey,
16 percent of the milk cows are under
three years of age, 34 percent are
three and four years of age, 16 per-
cent are 5 years of age, 13 percent
six years of age, 9 percent seven
years of age, and 12 percent are over
seven years old.
There are now about 5 percent
fewer milk cows on Wisconsin farms
than there were in 1955. This decrease
in number may account for the
smaller percentage of young cows
now in herds as well as the drop in
the number of cows over seven years
old. The recent decrease in the num-
ber of milk cows probably resulted in
fewer young cows added, and culling
old cows has also taken place.
Little variation from one area of
the state to another appears in the
proportion of milk cows in the differ-
ent age groups. This is particularly
true of the proportion of cows three
and four years old.
Age as percent of milk cows in herds
S years    6 years    7 years
Percent of total
1 4
16
16
15
1 7
1 5
16
1 7
14
16
13
12
14
t3
1 3
1 3
14
13
13
1 3
9
10
9
9
10
8
8
7
10
9
Over        All milk
7 yearn      cows
13
1 4
13
109
13
12
1 2
13
12
100
100
100
100
100
100
ion
100
also asked whether or not they had
seen sharptail grouse or prairie chick-
ens and ruffed grouse since October.
Farmers in nearly three-fourths of
the counties reported having seen
sharptail grouse or prairie chickens,
and farmers in all but two counties
said they had seen some ruffed grouse.
For the state as a whole, more than
9 percent of the farmers reporting
said they had seen sharptail grouse
or prairie chickens since October.
Thirteen percent of the farmers re-
porting in the northern third of the
state said they had seen sharptail
grouse or prairie chickens compared
with 8 percent in the central third of
the state and 5 percent in the south-
ern third. About 16 percent of the
farmers in the northeastern and east-
ern counties reported seeing these
birds while less than 3 percent of the
farmners reporting in the south-central
counties reported seeing sharptail
grouse or prairie chickens.
Ruffed grouse were seen since Octo-
ber by 35 percent of the farmers mak-
ing reports. More farmers saw ruffed
grouse in the northern and central
counties of the state than in the
southern third.
June 1961
Age of Milk Cows on Wisconsin Farms, 1961 Comparisons'
-
.
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