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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XL ([covers January 1961/December 1961])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XL, no. 5,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (2.5 MB)


Page 2


2        (18)
WISCONSIN CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
May 1961
Wisconsin Hay Acreage Winterkilled
District
PERCENT of WISCONSIN FARMS WITH SALES-
Clover and
Alfalfa            timothy
961     1960     1961   1960
crop     crop     crop    crop
Percent of total
Northwest
North -
Northeast
West
Central.
bast a        - -
Southwest    -
South..
Southeast
State
6
6
12
3
4
5
9
8
6.6
2
19
4
to
S
3
2
5
S. 2
6
6
7
10
3
3
4
5
6.3
percent for clover and timothy are a
little below a year ago.
Wisconsin farmers lost about 7 per-
cent of their hay acreage because of
winterkilling. This loss was a little
more than reported last year, but
probably not excessive considering
the little snow cover over much of the
state during the past winter. The per-
centage loss of hay from winter-
killing was about the same for both
alfalfa and clover and timothy al-
though it varied considerably from
one area of the state to another.
Wisconsin Acreage Plowed for Corn
by May I
District
Sown by    Sown by   Usually
May I1     May 1,   sown by
1961      1960      May I
Perent of tot.l
2
16
1i     PERCENT of
I5                I
4.1              l
I FARM INCOME
I-
I
I
I
During the past ten years the number of small farms has been de-
creasing and the number of large farms has been growing. Average
size of form In Wisconsin is gaining with greater productivity per farm.
But 45 percent of the farms in the state still have cash receipts from
sale of farm products of $5,000 or less. These farms account for only
11 percent of the total cash farm income In Wisconsin.
On the other hand, 4 percent of the farms with cash receipts of
over $40,000 per farm contribute 26 percent of the state's cash farm
income. A third of the farms have cash sales of from $5,000 to $10,000
per farm and contribute 30 percent of the total. About a third of
the total cash farm income in the state comes from 18 percent of the
farms with sales of $10,000 to $40,000.
Northwest
North
Northeast
West
Central
East
Southwest
South
Southeast
State
37
26
20
36
24
63
17
28
40
33
24
16
12
16
13
43
10
20
23
20
46
39
28
47
38
72
31
43
54
45
Milk Production Falls
Below April Last Year
Wisconsin dairy herds produced a
little less milk during April of this
year than they (lid a year ago. This
drop in production followed the record
March output.
Milk production on Wisconsin farms
in April is estimated at 1,682 million
pounds compared with 1,692 million
pounds produced in April last year
and the 10-year average for the
month of 1,553 million pounds. April
milk plioduction was 8 percent more
than average for the month.
Reports from Wisconsin crop cor-
respondents show milk production per
cow milked on May 1 was about 1
percent below a year earlier but the
percentage of the milk cows milked
was greater. For the nation, milk
production per cow set a new record
for May 1, and there was also an in-
crease over a year earlier in the per-
centage of the milk cows milked.
Milk production on Wisconsin farms
during the first four months of this
year was 6,264 million pounds of milk
or practically the same quantity as
was produced in the corresponding
period last year. Dairy herds in the
nation produced 1 percent more milk
in April than they did a year ago,
and production for the first four
months shows an increase of less than
1 percent. Milk production on farms
in the nation during April was 3 per-
cent above the 10-year average for
the month.
Farm Product Prices
Show Mixed Trends
Wisconsin's index of prices received
by farmers fell about 1 percent from
March to April but shows a gain of
less than 2 percent from April last
year.
Substantial decreases from a year
ago in the prices received by farmers
for poultry, eggs, and most crops
were more than offset by higher
prices received for milk and meat
animals as a whole. Higher prices for
hogs and calves more than offset de-
creases in the prices received for beef
cattle, sheep, and lambs from April
last year.
Prices received for milk sold in
April may average $3.45 a hundred
pounds for milk of average test. If
this forecast holds, milk prices will
average a cent below March but 15
cents more than the April 1960 price.
Poultry and egg prices received by
Wisconsin farmers in April dropped
sharply from the averages of last
year. Prices received for eggs last
month averaged 30 cents a dozen and
chicken prices 151/2 cents a pound.
April 1960 prices were 34 cents for
eggs and 171/2 cents for chickens.
Chicken prices last month averaged
the second lowest in more than twenty
years. Turkey prices in April aver-
aged 21 cents a pound compared with
27 cents a year ago and were the low-
est for the month since 1941.
Prices received per hundredweight
in April averaged $16.60 for hogs,
$16.40 for beef cattle, $24.30 for
calves, $4.80 for sheep, and $15.10 for
lambs. Hog prices increased $1.70
compared with April last year and
calf prices showed a gain of a dollar.
Lamb prices averaged $15.10 last
month compared with $19.60 in April
last year.
Included in the decreases from
April last year in crop prices is the
drop of nearly a dollar a hundred
pounds for potatoes. Potato prices in
April averaged $2.10 a hundred
pounds compared with $3.00 a year
ago.
-
-d
May 1961
_
.-
1 I
I
I/ /                     " I/I


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