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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XL ([covers January 1961/December 1961])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XL, no. 3,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page 2


2        (10)
WISCONSIN CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
Wisconsin and United States Planted Acreage
Wisconsin                                                         United
States
Crop                        Acreage planted (000 omitted)          1961 as
a percent of        Acreage planted (000 omitted)          1961 as a percent
of
0-yearY                      10-year                                 10-year
                    10-year
Intended        1960        average        1960        average      Intended
      1960        average        190          aware
1961                      1950.59                    1950.59        1961
                    1950-59                     1905
Corn. ----    - --.                        2,75          2,861         2,666
         104          111.6       82, 450       62,906       60,429     
    99.4         102.5
Oats-----e      ----- -    -- ------        2,554        2,365         2,673
          108          88.9       32,480        32,337       42,765     
   100.4          75.9
Spring whe-------l-            --------        32           38          
101            84          31.7       15,427       I1S.641       13,835 
        98.6         111.5
Spring wheatl -    -    : --- - -   ---------- 32           27          
40           119          60..0 ,2,201             12,420        16,900 
       98.2          72.2
Winter wheat.       ----       ---      -      30           29          
 30          103          100.0       43,926        43,213       48,366 
       101.6          90.8
Rye ------------------                         43           37          
 73           115          56.9        4,188         4,199        4,066 
        99.7         103.0
Fla -------------    ---------         348                              
      75          37.5         3,179        3,527         4,653         90.1
         6.
Potaretedarae:                                                          
             o oneso all  pu8o.3
Tobacco'...                              55------  S  53            54  
       103          101.9         S.34         1,457         1,470      
 105.3         104.4
S    ---as2                               15.2          14.6          14.52
      104         104.7         1,6           ,44          140          
10.             9
Suaryheats2__.                                lOS           102         
 87           13          I2.         26,2          24,275        19,529
       108.9         135.3
All hayl'     -----        ----------           7            6.3        
  9.99        III          70.1        1,087           977           868
       111.3         125.2
Peas for procssing  - ..  .      3,986        4,026         4,002       
   99           99.6       68,747        69,294       73,791          99.2
         93.2
Peasforprocssig  --   ---------    93            82          125.23     
  113          74.3           395          351           449        112.5
         88.0
Onions.. ------------------                     2.3          2.51       
  2.971       92           77.4          IN0            M02          107'
       98.0          93.5
1 f arvestrd acreage~.  'Growr, :,one for all plurposes.
for milk, meat animals, poultry, and
eggs. Crop prices averaged below
February last year.
Prices received for milk sold by
Wisconsin farmers in February aver-
aged $3.60 a hundred pounds for milk
of average test. This price was off 9
cents from the January average but
18 cents above February 1960 and the
highest for the month since 1953.
State's Egg Production
Drops to 20-Year Low
The number of layers in Wisconsin
farm flocks during February was the
smallest for the month since records
began in 1925. And egg production
during the month hit the lowest level
for any February since 1941.
Estimates for February show the
number of layers in farm flocks was
(i percent below a year ago and 22
pielcent less than the 5-year average
for the month. Egg production per
layer also shows a drop of 6 percent
front February last year but was up
4t percent from the 5-year average.
Egg production on Wisconsin farms
in February is estimated at 158 mil-
lion eggs. This production is off 12
percent from February last year and
19 percent lower than average for the
month. During the first two months
of this year, Wisconsin farm flocks
produced 10 percent fewer eggs than
in the same months of 1960.
The nation's farm flocks laid 4,856
million eggs in February. Egg pro-
duction in the nation was 6 percent
below February of last year. This de-
crease was primarily because of a
reduction in the number of layers and
one less day in February this year.
Number of State's Farms
Drops a Fifth in 10 Years
A good appraisal of the drop in
number of farms in Wisconsin can
now be made since enough prelimi-
nary data from the United States
Census of Agriculture taken in 1959
have become available. The total num-
ber of farms in the state has been
falling steadily for 25 years. The
rate of decline in the past decade
amounts to about 2.1 percent a year.
While this rate by itself is not
large, it has been persistent and over
this long period accounts for a sub-
stantial loss of farms in Wisconsin.
On the average, each year over the
past decade between three and four
thousand farms have disappeared.
Wisconsin's Number of Farms
1950-59'
Size group
Under 50 acres .
50-179 acres  .
180-259 acres .
260-500 acres .
Over 500 acres .
IAdjusted for change in definition of farms. I .  '
This annual decline in farms is
equivalent to losing in a single year
the number of farms in an important
agricultural county such as Grant,
Dodge, or Clark. In fact, the state's
loss of farms over the past 10-year
period would equal eight and a half
times the present number of farms in
1959    1954  j   1950
Number of farms
14,076  18,156    23,884
74,978  92,286   105,350
24,238  24,624    24,458
. 15,630  14,401  .13,086
. 2,292  2,035     1,783
CHANGES IN WISCONSIN
Iqril-   59
a leading farm county such as Dane.
The downtrend in farms has not
been uniform throughout the state,
but it has had a serious impact in all
counties in the loss of farm families
and in the economy of small towns
and trading centers.
Agricultural output has increased
despite the fall in number of farms.
Farms are now larger and more pro-
ductive. Sharpest disappearance of
farms occurred in those under 50
acres. This reflects the growth in
urbanization around cities and the
economic necessity for larger, com-
mercially scaled units to cope with
higher costs of farm output. Farms
over 500 acres have increased 29 per-
cent, and those over 1,000 acres 43
percent in number since 1950. Farms
above 260 acres now account for a
substantial part of Wisconsin's farm
output.
Land in farms has dropped about 7
percent in the past ten years in Wis-
consin compared with a drop of 22
percent in number of farms since
1950. The average size of a Wisconsin
farm increased 10 percent over this
period and is now 161 acres-largest
in the state's history.
FARM NUMBERS
'4
__J
Wt "C~'It DI 1f -R1~ III .'J1 T  SFR UQr
March 1961


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