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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XL ([covers January 1961/December 1961])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XL, no. 1,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (1.8 MB)


Page 2


WISCONSIN CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
January 1961
oats, 40 percent for flaxseed, 71 per-
cent for barley, and 56 percent for
rye.
Nation's Crop Summary
Snow, cold, and wet weather in
some parts of the nation held farm
activities at a slow pace. However,
livestock held up well even though
the weather was unfavorable. Live-
stock feeding was heavy during De-
cember.
Stocks of feed grains on farms in
the nation on January 1 were 2 per-
cent above a year earlier and the
highest on record. Hay supplies on
farms were the third largest on rec-
ord and 6 percent above January 1
last year. Farmers reported fall-sown
grains in good condition. Production
of winter vegetables is expected to be
4 percent below last year but 6 per-
cent above average.
State's Milk Production
Shows Gain in December
Reports from Wisconsin farmers
indicate 1,331 million pounds of milk
were produced during December. This
production was 1 percent above De-
cember 1959 and 14 percent above
average for the month. Milk produc-
tion per cow averaged a little higher
than in December 1959 and more than
offset the decrease in milk cows.
Milk cows went into the winter in
excellent condition and weather condi-
tions have been more favorable to
milk production than last winter. But
January 1 reports show milk produc-
tion per cow averaged slightly lower
than a year earlier.
Milk production in the nation dur-
ing December is estimated at 9,487
million pounds-1 percent more than
in December 1959 and 9 percentabove
average for the month. The nation's
dairy herds produced about 125%
billion pounds of milk in 1960, ac-
cording to preliminary monthly esti-
mates. This is 1 percent more than
the 1959 total and 9 percent above
the 10-year average. Milk production
per cow on January 1 failed to show
the usual year-to-year gain but was
22 percent above the average for the
date.
State's 1960 Egg Output
Was Lowest Since 1954
Egg production on Wisconsin farms
in December was the lowest for the
month since 1946, and the total of
the monthly estimates for 1960 shows
egg output for the year the smallest
since 1954.
Farm flocks in the state laid 183
million eggs in December or 16 per-
cent fewer eggs than in December
1959. The drop in egg production
from December was because of de-
creases of about 12 percent in the
number of layers and 5 percent in the
rate of production per layer.
About 2,265 million eggs were pro-
duced by Wisconsin farm flocks in
1960, according to the total of the
monthly estimates. The 1960 egg pro-
duction was 6 percent below the num-
ber of eggs produced in 1959.
The nation's farm flocks produced
5 percent fewer eggs in December
than in December 1959 with decreases
shown in both the number of layers
and the rate of production per layer.
Total egg production for 1960 is esti-
mated at 3 percent below the previ-
ous year. If the total of the monthly
estimates holds true in the final esti-
mate, the nation's egg production last
year will be the lowest since 1957.
This year began with the number
of layers on the nation's farm flocks
4 percent below January 1 last year
and the lowest on record for the date.
The number of potential layers in
flocks an January 1 was 3 percent be-
low a year earlier. This number in-
cludes hens and pullets of laying age
plus pullets not of laying age. The
number of pullets not of laying age
is up 13 percent from the beginning
of 1960.
Farm Product Prices
Make A Good Gain
Wisconsin's index of purchasing
power of farm products in December
was 88 percent of the 1910-14 aver-
age and showed a gain of 10 percent
from December 1959 and the highest
for the month since 1953. Purchasing
power is the ratio of prices received
to prices paid by farmers.
The increase in purchasing power
resulted from a gain over December
1959 in the index of prices received
for products sold by the state's farm-
ers of 10 percent. Practically no
change took place in the index of
prices paid by farmers. Wisconsin's
index of prices received in December
was 264 percent of the 1910-14 aver-
age compared with 300 percent for
the index of prices paid.
While the sharp increase in milk
prices carried the most weight in
boosting the index of all farm prod-
uct prices to the highest level for any
December since 1953, higher prices
for meat animals, poultry, and eggs
also contributed. Crop prices showed
a slight drop from December 1959.
Prices received for milk sold by
Wisconsin farmers in December may
average $3.80 a hundred pounds of
milk of average test. This price is 27
cents or nearly 8 percent more than
the December 1959 average and the
highest for the month since 1952.
Milk prices for 1960 may average
$3.49 a hundred pounds or 6 percent
more than the 1959 annual average.
Wisconsin's index of meat animal
prices for December registered a gain
of 17 percent over a year earlier
mostly as a result of the much higher
hog prices. Some price gains also oc-
curred for beef cattle, and calves.
Sheep and lamb prices averaged a
little below December 1959.
The state's farmers received prices
for hogs sold in December averaging
$15.90 a hundredweight or $5 more
than a year earlier. Hundredweight
prices received for other meat ani-
mals include $14.30 for beef cattle,
$21.40 for calves, $3.70 for sheep, and
$15.20 for lambs.
Prices received for eggs sold in
December averaged 47 percent above
the unusually low prices of December
1959. December egg prices averaged
38' cents a dozen compared with 26
cents in December 1959, and poultry
prices were up slightly. Crop prices
at the end of 1960 were off 1 percent
from a year earlier as a result of
lower feed grain and hay prices.
United States Farm Pricess
Prices received by the nation's
farmers in December rose slightly
from November and showed a gain of
5 percent from December 1959. No
change in the index of prices paid is
reported, and the index of purchasing
power of farm products at 88 percent
of the 1910-14 average rose 5 percent
from December 1959.
Farm Employment Down
But Wages Rise
The number of workers, both hired
and family, on Wisconsin farms dur-
ing December was smaller than a
year ago and average for the month.
Estimates show the farm labor force
in December consisted of 17,000 hired
workers and 228,000 family workers
bringing the total of 245,000 com-
pared with 260,000 in December 1959
and the average for the month of
267,000 workers.
Wages paid by Wisconsin farmers
to hired workers employed on Janu-
ary 1 averaged 2 percent above a
year earlier and the highest for the
date. At the beginning of the year,
Wisconsin farmers were paying
wages averaging $199 a month with
a house and $146 a month with board
and room. Wages by the day aver-
aged $6.70 with board and room and
$8.60 without board or room. Work-
ers hired by the hour averaged $1.08
without board or room.
Farm Workers and Wages
Wisconsin and United States
1959-60
Item
Farm workers
Hired
Family
Total        X
Wage rates
By the month
With house
With board & roo,
By the day
With board & room
No board or room
By the hour
No board or room
Wisconsin     United States
1960    1959    19601   1959
Monthly average (000)
29      30   1,869  1925
253     269   5,249  5 459
282     299   7,118  7,384
Deas.
198.00 190.00
146.00 141.00
6.90   6.90
8080   8.70
1.09   1.08
192.00
149.00
6.50
6 60
.97
186. 00
144.00
6.30
6.40
.95
X lersono employed luiring the last full calendar weeL
ending at least one day before the end of the miuouth.
=
I
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