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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XXIX ([covers January 1950/December 1950])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XXIX, no. 4,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page 4


WISCONSIN CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
since mid-February and was 5 per-
cent below March a year ago.
Milk prices for March have shown
so far a relatively small seasonal de-
cline despite the good winter milk-
flow. The preliminary average price
for March of $3.05 is about the same
as for March last year although milk
production is running higher.
The sharp drop in egg prices
earlier this year recovered somewhat
by mid-March, but the poultry and
eggs index was still 22 percent below
the average level for March in 1949.
Support price-programs on poultry
and turkeys have been terminated for
the balance of 1950.
Returns to farmers for livestock
and meat animals declined nearly 2
percent between mid-February and
mid-March reflecting the easier tone
in livestock markets during the pre-
Easter season.
The exchange value of Wisconsin
farmers' farm dollar as measured by
the index of purchasing power con-
tinues to fall behind the first quarter
of 1949. During March, increases in
costs and farm living expenses rose
while the farm price index dropped.
The net effect on the Wisconsin index
of farm dollar purchasing power was
a decline of 2 percent so that the mid-
March level of the index was 96 per-
cent of the 1910-14 average.
United States Farm Prices
The index of prices paid by farm-
ers including  interest, taxes, and
wage rates rose 2 points during the
month ended March 15. During the
same period, the index of prices re-
ceived  by  farmers  remained  un-
changed at 237.
The rise in the parity index resulted
from widespread, but mostly small
price increases in several of the
groups of commodities bought for
both living and production. Feeder
livestock were substantially higher;
building materials, food, and feed ad-
vanced moderately. Prices of auto
supplies, farm supplies, and seed
were a little lower. The production
component of the parity index was
2 points higher than last month.
However, the net effect of changes in
family living items wvas not enoueph
to raise that index.
Although the index of prices re-
ceived by farmers was unchanged this
month, prices of fruit, cotton, grain,
Stocks of Grain on Farms
(April I estimates)
Crop
Wisconsin
Corpl ---
Wheat -
Oats --- -
Barley--
Rye.
Soybeans.-
United States
Corn'
Wheat.--
Barley
Rye-- -  -  -
Soybeans --
I Data based on corn for grain.
Thousands of bushels on hand
1950
41,181
1 084
45,555
2,109
347
114
1,634,182
1", 169
481,216
70,692
3.294
44.014
1949
27,407
1,191
46,675
2,248
364
78
1,797,522
246,024
578,832
111,408
5,495
S2,279
2Short-time average.
meat animals, and poultry and eggs
were higher. These increases were
offset by decreases in prices of truck
crops and dairy products.
Stocks of Grain on Farms
In Wisconsin stocks of corn on
farms at the beginning of April were
much larger than a year ago and
over twice average holdings. Stocks
of wheat, oats, barley, and rye on the
state's farms were a little smaller
than the big holdings of a year ago,
but all of them are above average.
For the United States farm hold-
ings of corn, wheat, oats, barley, rye,
and soybeans are smaller than a year
ago, but the corn and oats and soy-
bean stocks are well above average.
I0-yr.
aerage
1939-48
20, 104
770
39,749
I ,6032
2842
2372
1,183,632
216,243
451,932
76,5062
4,6242
34,9522
Percent of pre,
year's crop
1950
53.0
43.0
38.0
33.0
29.0
46.0
52.6
17.4
36.4
29.7
17.6
19.8
1949
45.0
41.0
37.0
29.0
33.0
40.0
52.8S
18.7
38.8
35.3
20. 8
23.4
rious
'IO
10-yr.
average
1939-48
37.4
45.5
38.5
28.52
29.22
40.22
47.1
22.2
36.6
27.12
18.6'
18.42
sonal trend. According to April 1
reports from the state's crop corre-
spondents, farm workers are receiv-
ing $127 a month with a house fur-
nished, which is $8 less than the aver-
age rate a year ago. Workers receiv-
ing board and room receive $96 per
month or $10 less than in April last
year.
Farm workers hired by the day or
hour are also receiving lower wages
than a year ago. Rates average $4.50
a day with board and room and $5.80
a day without board or room. These
rates are 30 cents under a year ago.
A drop of only 2 cents an hour is
shown for workers hired by the hour
and receiving no board or room. The
Farm Wages Lower This Spring      houll rate
Wisconsin farmers are paying lower
wages to hired workers than they did
when spring work began last year.       Wiscons
The decline in wage rates paid by
farmers is general in the surrounding       Per P
states and for the nation as a whole.
Factors contributing to the drop in      With
the level of farm wages include the        house
lower cash farm income and a larger
labor supply. The labor supply has        --- -
been increased by some decline in   1949
factory employment, a larger number  Jan. - 136.00
of new workers added to the labor   JAplry-- 1315.00
force. and the increased use of farm  Oct.n179 oo
machinery.
Wages paid to    Wisconsin farm   19-    126.00
workers increased slightly from Janu-  Apr- 127.00
ary to April, which is the usual sea-
mis year is 77 cents an
in Farm Wage Rates
Month
With
board
and
room
$102.00
106.00
105.00
102.00
93.00
96.00
Per Day
With
board
and
room
$4.95
4.80
5.00
4.95
4.60
4.50
Without
board
or
room
$6.30
6.10
6.20
6.20
5.80
S.80
Per Hour
Without
baord
or
room
$ .81
.79
.81
.80
.77
.77
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE             PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE
TO AVOID
BIUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS                    PAYMENT OF POSTAGE,
8300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
RETURN AFTER FIVE DAYS TO
AGRICULTURAL STATISTICIAN
BOX 351
MADISON, WISCONSIN
Form  1'AH-4-50--6,712  Permnit 1001
DlISCO lSt' FREE LIBRARY COMMISSION
STATE CAPITOL
MADISIC, WIS.
VR
4
(16)
- --~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~A                                                 
                                                       ri      1
4
-
r
I
April 1950n


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