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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XXIX ([covers January 1950/December 1950])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XXIX, no. 3,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (2.1 MB)


Page 2


WISCONSIN CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
March     1950
Wisconsin and United States Planted Acreage
Wisconsin
Acreage planted (000 emitted)
'949
2,621
3,030
189
86
17
81
20. 1
48
3,934
120
2.1
10-year
average
1939-48
2,485
2,678
366
51
12
144
22.5
116
4,093
135.6
1.8
1950 as a percent of
10-year
1949       average
1939-48
96          101
101          114
108           56
97          163
82          117
10           56
too           90
121           50
103           99
100           88
100          117
-(Growni alone for all purposes. Partly duplicated in hay acreage.
United States
Acreage planted (000 omitted)
Intended
1950
82, 765
47,964
13,879
19,727
4,027
1,861.8
1,581.9
13,500
75,091
409.7
162.8
1949
87,910
44,525
1 1, 208
22,559
5, 199
1,923.6
1,626.3
11 409
72,835
406.2
119.6
10-year
average
1939-48
89,825
42,891
14,713
18,072
3.869
2,717.9
1,649.6
12,059
74,470
431.4
131.6
over 20,000 acres-the same as
planted last year and 10 percent be-
low average.
United States Acreages
Of the 17 crops for which acreage
planting plans have been reported for
the United States, 8 crops may have
larger acreages and the other 9 may
be planted on smaller acreages. Lar-
ger acreages of barley, oats, sor-
ghums, sweet potatoes, soybeans, cow-
peas, hay, and sugar beets are in
prospect.
The nation's corn crop is expected
to be planted on an acreage 6 percent
smaller than a year ago, and a de-
crease of nearly 13 percent is now
intended for the spring wheat acre-
age. Farmers now plan an increase of
more than 7 percent in the oat acre-
age and nearly 24 percent in the acre-
age of barley.
A somewhat delayed spring is in
prospect in our part of the country.
Snow and ice in the north central
states were widespread in March. In
the southern states cool and rainy
weather prevailed. Growth of early
crops in the south has been retarded
by low temperatures. Elsewhere in
the country the season has been about
normal so far.
Milk Production
Wisconsin dairy herds produced
l billion 123 million pounds of milk
during February. This was 1 percent
more that the production in Febru-
ary 1949 and was 12 percent above
the 1929-48 average for the month.
In January Wisconsin's milk pro-
duction was lower than in January
1949 because of lower milk production
per cow. However, in February milk
production per cow was higher than
in February last year and this com-
bined with a slightly larger number
of milk cows on farms was respon-
sible for an increase in total produc-
tion. The total for the two months
this year-January and February-is
about equal to that in the same
months last year.
For the country as a whole milk
production during February set a
new record high. Milk production per
cow was also a new record for the
month and this was combined with an
increase of about 1 percent in the
number of milk cows on farms. Total
production was 8,671 million pounds,
3 percent above February 1949 and
6 percent higher than the 10-year
average for February.
Temperatures were above average
during February over a broad section
of the country. Cold stormy weather
prevailed during the first week in
Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Mon-
tana while in the final week it was
cold and stormy in the northern dairy
area from Minnesota eastward. Mild
weather and sufficient rainfall brought
better than usual pasture in the South
Atlantic and South Central states.
Egg Production High
Egg production on Wisconsin farms
during February equaled the record
of 225 million eggs established in
February 1944. There were about 3
percent fewer layers on hand this
year than in February 1944.
Wisconsin farm flocks laid over
51/2 percent more eggs last month
than the same month a year ago and
7 percent more than the 5-year 1944-
48 average output. The number of
layers on farms during February was
the second largest number on record
-6 percent above a year ago and 2
percent above the 5-year average
number for the month. The rate of
production dropped slightly as a re-
sult of the cold weather during Feb-
ruary. Layers averaged 13.55 eggs
per layer compared with 13.61 a year
ago and the 5-year average of 12.92
eggs each.
Farm flocks of the nation were
6 percent larger than in February
1949, but about 31/2 percent less than
the 5-year 1944-48 average number.
The rate of production was 13.25 eggs
per layer which is the highest rate on
record for the month of February.
With higher rate of production and
larger numbers of layers on hand,
egg output was 8 percent above a
year ago and 5 percent above the
5-year 1944-48 average.
Wisconsin Farm Prices
The general level of Wisconsin
farm product prices remained steady
from January to February although
there was a seasonal drop in milk
prices and some increase in the prices
of meat animals. February farm
prices, however, showed a drop of
more than four percent below Febru-
ary 1949.
Compared with a year ago, Wis-
consin farmers received prices for
poultry and eggs averaging about 27
percent lower and all other classes of
farm products except milk were lower
this past February. Meat animal
prices averaged about 5 percent below
February 1949, crops more than 8 per-
cent lower, and feed grain and hay
dropped almost 10 percent.
Milk prices paid Wisconsin pro-
ducers averaged $3.15 per hundred-
weight in February, which is 10 cents
lower than January but 4 cents above
the February 1949 average price.
The February prices paid for milk
used in condensery products showed
the only decline from a year ago and
were more than offset by increases in
milk prices for other utilizations.
Prices paid for commodities pur-
chased for farm production and
family living showed a slight drop
from January to February and aver-
aged between 5 and 6 percent less
than February of last year. The pur-
chasing power of the Wisconsin farm
dollar during February was a little
more than in January and about
2 percent above February 1949.
United States Farm Prices
For the nation prices received for
farm products increased slightly dur-
ing January and February but the
February general level was 7 percent
below a year earlier. Higher prices
for meat animals and cotton were
mainly responsible for the current
increase in the level of all prices.
Crops, truck crops, dairy products,
poultry, and eggs were lower in Feb-
ruary than in January. Prices paid
by the nation's farmers in February
were 2 percent below a year earlier.
The parity ratio (ratio of the index
of prices received by farmers to the
index of prices paid by farmers in-
cluding interest, taxes, and wage
rates) rose slightly from January to
February but was below a year ago.
Current Trends
The following are some current
trends in agriculture and industry.
Additional information may be found
in the "Current Trends" table on
page 3.
Feed costs dropped from a year
ago. During February 1,000 pounds
of Wisconsin dairy ration cost $24.44,
which is about one dollar less than a
year earlier. Milk prices in February
of this year averaged slightly higher
than a year ago and feed costs have
dropped to the extent that 100 pounds
2
(10)
Crop
Corn
Oats.
Barley.  .
Spjring wheat -
Potatoes
Tobacco'
Soybeans2 .
All hay' .
Canning peas
Onions
IAt reag, harvested.
Intended
1950
2,516
3,060
204
83
14
81
20.2
58
4,052
120
2.1
1950 as a percent of
I0-year
1949      average
1939-48
94.1        92.1
107.7      111.8
123.8       94.3
87.4       109.2
77.5       104.1
96.8        68,5
97.3        95.9
118.3       111.9
103.1       108.8
100.9       95.0
136.1       123.7
I
=
- -
-
_


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