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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XXIX ([covers January 1950/December 1950])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XXIX, no. 1,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (2.1 MB)


Page 2


WISCONSIN CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
January 1950
Crop Summary of United States 1948 and 1949
Crop
Corn
Oats     .
Barley    .
Rye -        --   - ---- ----
Spring wheat other than durum
Durum wheat -
Winter wheat
Buckwheat --
Dry peas -
Dry edible beans.
Soybeans for grain"  ---
Flax
Red clover seed
Sweet clover seed
Timothy seed
Alfalfa seed..
Alsike seed.
All tame hay
Alfalfa..- - - - -- - - - - -
All clover and timothy-   -
Annual legume..
Grain cut green
Millet, Sudan and other hay
Wild hay
Potatoes
Tobacco
Cabbage, for market
Cabbage, kraut
Onions, commercial
Sorgo sirup
Sugar beets
Cucumbers for pickles
Peas, processing.
Corn, processing.
Snap beans for processing
Beets, processing
Green lima beans for processing
Tomatoes, processing
Apples, commercial!-
Cherries4
Cranberries'
Maple sugar".
Maple sirup'
Strawberries   -
Grapes
Grand Total-
1949
(Prelim.
inary)
86,735
40,560
9,879
1 .558
17,773
3.SS5
55.453
279
335
1,852
9,912
4,880
1,239.0
234.6
292.3
946.2
57,917
17,288
19,274
3,673
2,5S83
15,0999
14,918
1,901.3
1,626.3
170.91
17. 54
119.54
90
690
134.54
387.62
4SS. 82
108.41
17.3
101.6
358.7
7,9243
--127A 3
356,041
Acreage
(000 smins..I
1948
86,067
40,198
11,987
2,096
16,315
3,187
53,515
336
292
1I916
10,430
1 ,789.S
193.7
128.7
635.4
140.8
S8, 524
15.017
21,87S
4,524
2,207
14,898
14,694
2,100.3
1,554.2
179.4
19. 4!
127. 51
110
694
125.1
373.5
466. S
1102. 16
13.4
84.8
400.8S
8,00
122.82
I52,297
10-year
average
1938-47
88617
38 347
12 720
2,874
14,788
2,565
42,500
426
442
I S39
8025
3 ,248
1 ,754. 44
315. 7
406.43
892.76
142.28
60.675
14,731
21,607
6,S62
2,952
14,523
13,291
2,730.3
1, 654. 21
170.01
IS 42
132.9
186
796
99 74
394. 52
431.79
108.35
14.81
60.35
498.73
9,3iji
128.02
140,709
1949
(Prelim-
inary)
38.9
32.6
24.1
12,0
11.6
11.0
16.3
18.6
9.75
11.64
22.4
8.9
1.02
2.55
2.83
2.00
2.97
1.50
2.2Z3
1.28
.86
1.17
.82
211.4
1224
7,13
9.66
151
66.8
14,7
87
1843
3.07
2.15
8.33
1669
7.34
69.6
Yield per Acre
1948
42.8
37.1
26.4
12.6
16.0
14.0
18.8
18.8
12.26
10,87
21.4
11.2
1.00
2.96
3.15
1 .64
2.81
1.48
2,27
1.33
.74
1.29
1.16
.6
215.5
1274
7,4
10.47
162.5
69.7
13.6
79
1868
2.71
1 .3
7,03
1625
7.27
83.2
10-year
average
1938-47
31.4
32.1
24.0
12.1
14.5
17.0
16.7
12.31
9.19
18.7
9.2
.96
2.59
3. 52
1 .47
2.44
1.45
2.18s
1,36
.92
1.23
*1.10
.89
145. 5
1033
7.02
9.06
138.5
60.1
12.7
75
1918
2.42
1.69
7.57
1160
5 44
70. 3
1949
(Prelim-
inary)
3,377,790
1,322,924
238,104
18,697
205,931
38,864
901,668
5,184
3,267
21,554
222,305
43,664
1,262.2
598.1
S25. 8
1,885.7
343.6
87,009
38,546
24,657
3,161
2,963
17,682
12,296
401,962
1, 990, 129
1,218.3
169.4
18,067.5
6,012
10,168
11,690
714,560
1,398.3
233.01
144.1
169.600
2,633.7
133,1813
243.73
856.8
292
1 614
8,866
2,701.5
Production
(000 omitted)
1948
3,681,793
1,493,304
315,894
26,449
260,991
44,680
1,007,863
6,305
3,580
20,827
223,006
54 ,529
1,788.9
573.6
404.8
1,045.0
396.2
86,793
34,083
29,169
3,365
2,848
17,328
12,678
454,654
1,980,325
1,326.8
203.7
20,705. S
7,665
9,422
9,847
697,600
1,262.1
187.03
94.2
137,800
2,913.5
88,4073
214.38
967.7
229
1, 445
10,224
3,044.4
10-year
average
1938-47
2,787,628
1,234,082
304,741
35,109
229,141
36,256
726, 553
7,075
5,620
16,85S
148,381
30,102
1,654.21
S09. 31
1i424,88
1,315,52
340. If
87,684
32.217
29,575
6,301
3.582
168009
11, 855
393,403
1,718,375
1,195.3
170
18,342
11,176
10,14S
7,5S33
765,840
1,037.27
180.07
116,28
70,520
2,714.4
111,1143
172.22
665. 23
4680
2,228
9,138
2,736.16
Unit
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Cwt.
Cwt.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Ton
Ton
Ton
Ton
Ton
Ton
Ton
Bu.
Lb.
Ton
Ton
Cwt.
Gal.
Ton
Bu.
Lb.
Ton
Ton
Ton
Lb.
Ton
Bu.
Ton
Bbl.
Lb.
Gal.
Crt.3
Ton
Value of Production
(000 omitted)
1949
(Prelim.    1948
inary)
4,017,810 4 752,652
838,491 1,088,079
250,172   369,478
23,019    38,787
404,423   515,515
77,390    90,016
1,651,807 4,016,639
S,003     7,124
10,946    16,108
134,524   153,649
462, 48S  55,915
156,386   313,617
30,585    46,379
5,192     4,758
7,105    1821
41,227    26,104
5,914     6.679
2,163,659 2,349,Soi
563,508   703,166
912,671   953,897
36,674    37,310
2,082     2,959
62,680    54,519
10,343    12,776
106,099    99,915
16,538    IS,982
30,735    31,406
28,366    29,394
26,238    22,612
2,949     2,145
12,361    11,127
61,928    80,733
177,575   195,100
40,446    46,697
7,662     9,774
235       190
7,150     6,910
64 203    82,781
94,913   120,321
I Not ,wlud,dl o aereage grown for haV. 235 states. 3Includes some quantities
not harvested. 412 states. 55 states, ^10 states. 7Trees tapped. 824 quarts.
9Total harvested
a(re; of 52 rpots  littloldes some crops not listed ahove, hut exclodes crops
not harvested, minor crops, duplicated seed acreages, strawberries, and other
fruits.
December 1948. Both rate of produc-
tion and total eggs produced estab-
lished new December records for
Wisconsin and the United States.
There were 5 percent more layers
on Wisconsin farms in December
than a year ago and about 2 percent
motie than the 5-year average num-
ber for the month. The number of
layers in farm flocks of the nations
was 6 percent more than in Decem-
ber 1948 but about 3 percent fewer
than the 5-year average.
Stocks
Crop
Wisconsin
Barley
Rye
United
States
Barley
Rye
of Barley and Rye on Farms
(J.anuiary I estimiait s)
Thousand Bushels
on Hand
1950
3,963
478
107,532
4,807
1949
4,494
453
15G,352
8,749
9-yr
averl
1940
ge
48
7,738
935
152,733
15,433
Percent of
Previous Crop
1950
62.0
40.0
45.2
25.7
1949
58.0
41.0
49.5
33.1
9-yr.
RV.
1940-
48
64.8
65.4
48.7
43.3
was 252 percent of the 1910-14 aver-
age. The index at this level repre-
sented a decline of nearly 3 percent
from November and was nearly 12
percent below December in 1948. De-
clines in farm prices during the last
month of the year were general. The
biggest decline in prices was shown
by eggs which fell about 18 percent
in November and are now 25 percent
below the same period a year ago.
Milk prices seem to have held rela-
tively stable during the month and
were a big factor in stabilizing farm
returns as the year ended.
The purchasing power of the Wis-
consin farmer's dollar for the first
time in many months has again fallen
to the average of the 1910-14 base
period as measured by the relation-
ship between the prices for products
which the farmer sells and the prices
for products which the farmer buys.
The decline of purchasing power dur-
ing November was approximately
4 percent and in December was run-
ning about 7 percent below what it
was at the beginning of the year.
United States Farm Prices
Nationally, the index of purchasing
power on December 15 fell below 100
percent for the first time since
November 1941. The index of 98 per-
cent resulted from a decline in the
United States index of prices received
by farmers from 239 percent of the
1910-14 average in November to 236
percent accompanied by an increase
from 239 percent to 240 percent of the
1910-14 average in the index of
prices paid by farmers. For the coun-
try as a whole farm prices at the end
of the year were 23 percent below
their peak reached in 1948, while
farm costs were down only 6 percent.
Farm Wages
The general level of Wisconsin
farm wage rates now is between 7
and 8 percent below January of last
year. For the nation, farm wages
have declined between 2 and 3 percent
from a year ago.
Wages paid by Wisconsin farmers
rose steadily from 1933 until they
reached the all-time high in the sum-
mer of 1948. Contrary to the usual
trend, farm wages declined from the
beginning of the crop season last
year. The lower wages now being
paid result from the decline in the
prices of farm products, more efficient
use of farm machinery, and a larger
labor supply.
While farm wages now are lower
than a year ago, they are still at a
relatively high level. The Wisconsin
farm workers wages in January are
2
(2)
I
Wisconsin Farm Prices
The index of prices received by
Wisconsin farmers on December 15
l
-
11
.. . .
I
; -         :
___ -1 ..... . .
I _
I
I


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