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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XIV ([covers January 1935/December 1935])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XIV, no. 3,   pp. [9]-12 PDF (2.1 MB)


Page 12


WISCONSIN CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
Prices Paid Wisconsin Producers for Farm Products and Wisconsin Feed Costs'
LIVESTOCK AND WOOL
4
77.65
88.70
104.25
104.30
58.20
57 00
62 .35
63 75
66.25
80.50
89.85
102.40
107.25
84 .40
S6.85
38 .75
3  S.S1
33.
32.
32 .
33.
27 .
38.
42.
38.
38.
37.
33.
33.
35.'98
32.
3S.
36.
37.
37 .
34.
36.
36.
37.
36.
37.
38.
42.
46.
52.-
45     6.0
4 .64 6.60
5.00 7.0
5.87 8.21]
8.85 12 .31
11.22 14 .17
9.08 13 .51
7.83 12.55
3.80 7.37
4.92 10.2'
5.16 10.52'
5.62 10.8 1'
0.13 12 .32
6.19 12 .02
5.75 11.82
6.05 12.31
6.07 12.2'
4 .33 8.52
2.62 0.2!
1.80 4 .81
1.90 4 .91
1 .65 4 .22
1 .75 4.32
1 .75 4 .22
1.85 4.22
2 .30 5.12
2 .13 5 .71
2 .05 5.72
2 .12 5 .62
1 .85 5 .41
I .85 4 .221
1 .89 5.22
1 .70 5.12
2.335 6.1
1 .95 5.9'
2 .220 7.02
3 .00 7.31
3.00 7.12
3.00 7.12
2.10 6.62
2 .40 0.02
2 .20 5.12
1 .702 5 .22
1 .82 5.31
1 .80 5.12
2 .33 5 .42
2.75   6.82
3.422  7.22
31.612~ 68.8
7
CIS.
20.1
19.6
25.2
30.3
40.2
03.3
53.C
38.0
18.7
27 .4
37.2]
37 .7
40.2
35 A5
33 A1
30 .,
34-.2
23 .2
14.2
10.2
11.
10.
10.
23 .
24 .
24 .
25.
20C).
26.
27 .
23.2
27.
28.
28.
27.
24 .
23 .
23.
22i
21
21
21
20.
21 .
22 .
l1t.
1690.83
172.50
161 .40
156.50
iSI .30
147.70
143.70
141.20
114.30
111 .20
111 .70
100.90
108.20
111 .70
113.70
117.60
117.900
108.20l
91 o08
83 .75
02.25
83 .
85.
84 .
89.
93 .
97.
95.
00.
228.
228.
223.
811.
1228.41]
228.
100.
106.
III .
110.
III1.
115.
110.
112.
105.
108.
103 .
114 .
122 .
122.
GRAINS
9
920.8
89.5
14 .7
19.4
98.0
!05.6
!12.7
214 .7
.20.1
.07.3
.05.0
13 5
143 .7
137.2
123.1
117 .4
II11.7
03.1
63.7
54.8
88.2
47.
47.
47 .
52 .
66.
66.
91 .
85.
82.
726.
80.
79.
822.2
79.
81
81 .
80.
80.
89.
89.
97.
990.
98.
97 .
100.
90.
98.
85.
10
59.5
63.8
71.9
79.5
43 .8
52.3
40.4
37.3
59.5
59 .2
77.7
94.4
.02.9
74.3
87.1
92 .8
88.2
79.7
56.7
36.8
38.3
25.
24 .
25.
30.
30 .
40.
54 .
50.
48.
40.
42 .
43 .
59.8
45..
46.
47.
47.
48.
50.
59.
71.
73.
73 .
72.
81.
80.
70 .
70.
CIS
39.1
45. 1
44 .2
62.4
75 .4
65.8
78.f
37.2
37.7
42.4
49.2
43 .2
39.7
46.7
52.2
45.2.
38.2
28.2
23 .
28.2
17.
17.
17.
20.
25.
25.
40.
34 .
34.
30.
32 .
32.
40:
33.
34.
34 .
34 .
34.
41 .
42.
45.
48.
47.
47 .
40 .
490.
40 .
49.
69 .2
5S.7
63.3
78.5
121 .3
125.2
107.61
121 .9
60.0
SS.A
60.9
73.0
79.J
65.4
72.J
79.0
64 .1
58.0
44.1
37.2
42.1
27.
27.
27.
34.
44.
40.
57.
SI .
53.
51 .
53.
s0.
75.2
55.
59.
57.
53.
57.
71
72.
80.
100.
98.
99 .
102.
101 .
101 .
99 .
13
622 .1
65 .2
97.0
98 .6
165 .9
180 .5
136 .0
162.6
104 .1
70.3
66.
77 .1
98.8
82.1
88.4
08.1]
89.7
60.7
37.1
35.2
48.7,
222.
28 .
20.
36.
44 .
48.
75 .
02.
62.
55.
57.
54 .
612.2
55.
56.
54.
54.
53 .
58.
61
75.
60.
72 .
822.
72.
721.
66.
210.
OTHER CROPS
CI
14
CIS.
SO.7
50.9
37.2
98.3
163.3
78.6
114.4
123 .3
79.9
80.0
58.9
64.6
64.6
158.3
117.2
65.0
71 .2
115.0
55.3
26.2
49.8
23.
23.
23.
25.
24.
30.
60.
125.
90.
55.
Ss.
55.
SS.2
65.
60.
75.
65.
55.
59.
69 .
70 .
60.
32.
29 .
28.
28.
27.
24 .
12.78
10.00
9.88
11.20
14.28
19.42
20.68
22.89
15 .51
15.04
13 .41
15.33
13 .02
13 .82
14 .25
13.06
12.00
11 .08
10.88
10.3fl
9 .27
8.76
7.00l
8.30
8.511
9.511
10.111
10.21'
10 .12
9.01]
21.81
13 .62
11 .811
10.31]
10.71]
11 .611
12 .31
13 .32
12.82
16.02
15.71]
17.01
17.01
17.51
18.12
19.12
18.92
16
8.83
7.72
8.0
9.40
20.95
17.26
!5.88)
22.03
10.80
11 .04
11.42
13 .08
15.84
16.41
18.58
10.02
15.09
10.52
9 .79
7.00
6.18
5.30
5.40
5.50
0.011
0.3
6.46l
0.70
6.50
0,.41]
6.31]
6.311
0.61]
8.77,
6.711
7.31]
7.311
7 .21]
7.21]
8.21]
7.88
8.511
11 .02
It .22
10.911
11 .32
11.81
12 .21
1 1 X8
POULTRY PRODUCTS
AND FEED COSTS
17
11.2
11.6
11.0
13.0
16.2
20.2
22.0
24.0
19.8
18.3
17.3
17.8
19.2
21 .4
19.3
20.7
22.0
17.4
14' 7
11 .0
8.8
8.7
9.1
9.3
9.6
10.4
8.8
0 .3
8 .9
8.6
7 .9
7.5
7.6
10.2
8 .4
9.4
10.3
10.7
0.1
10.1
10.4
10.1
12.1]
13.1
14.1
00
18
CIS.
21 .3
22.3
21.7
25.0
33.9
39.5
43.8
46.8
32.9
28.5
29.2
30.2
33.2
31.3
28.6
30.3
31.5
24.1
17.8
15.9
14.4
20.8
11.2
10.5
10.0
11.9
9.1
12.4
11 .5
14.2
19.5
23.0
19.0
17.6
16.0
15.3
14.
13.3
13.4
12 .3
12.8
17.2
20.0
22.0
27.0
23.8
24.0
25.0
19A.
Ration'
19l2
2  a5 0.
19.7  20S.
27.82 102 .2
4 .17 112.9
5.32 122.1
85.75 105.2
:7.721322.8
,7.20 2146.7
3.14 104.7
35.39 106.7
7.5.2 122.9
8.73 149.2
5.87 126.1
7.21 539.6
8.89.4014.6
..004 193.5
10.44  83.2
80.24 681.8
5.78 43.1
6.21 49.7
7 .21 743.5
8 .87 70.8
11.74 953.
10.41  86.9
10 .24 81 .6
0.1 9795.8
12.31 74.2
12 .09 100.6
10.36 822.5
10.4q119 8.3
14 .05 112 .3
16.46 131 .2
10.33 1130.41
15 .99 127.4
bs.
7'a
'74
216
170
174
154
163
325
143
161
177
177
19
1631
184
161
170
211
16'I
362
19t
131
134
102
131
212
242
20'
131
172
141
131
101
10.
122
131
15:
18I
14.
14
16
WISCONSIN BY PRODUCT
FEED COSTS
.9         -
~0
* ~~~~~~~~~~0C
Co we le   Ca~~~ 90 e
22   23    24    25   26   27
!2.80 32.55 41 .24 23 .81 26.81
4.07 31 .08 44 .28 24 .83 28.21
!2 .95 35.83 43 .64 24 .55 28 .24
!3.81 38.44 45 .53 25.33 28.08
.5.69 50.20 75.98 39.33 46 .061-
14.55 58.26 98.08 35.75 54.01
:2.80 74 .10 101 .80 48.74 83 .34
15.90 68.42 104 .15 49.63 66.04  --
!I .85 41 .16 52.79 21 .76 35.80 42.32
!3.66 51 .62 62.32 24.58 36.00 50.65
~7.88 49.72 80.28 28.02 43 .85 52.67
!5.62 46.67 54.82 26.85 40.06 48.68
!7.64 45.44 90.80 39.47 39.55 45.16
!5.60 48.44 70.12 25.98 35.07 37.64
!9.56 49.17 71 .87 31 .86 35.75 43 .09
12.87 53.66 70.00 34 22 41.98 56.36
!9.11 57.20 71.82 30.17 41 .70 47.15
24.40 48.30 61.81 24 .60 34.75 40.24
.5.78 32.00 40.40 15.64 23.96 28.20
12 .44 26.31 27 .65 12 .34 14 .98 21 .33
15.21 30.60 35 .45 15.81 20.15 25.87
10.60 22.30 24.80 10.30 14.50 19.95
11.00 21 .90 25 .00 11.35 14.05 19.40
13.65 22.80 31.55 12 .90 15.80 21.65
13 .00 24.25 36.55 13 .50 17 .05 22.80
14 .50 27 .80 43.40 14 .60 18.85 25.30
14.10 30.10 45 .90 14.90 20.15 26.30
20.10 40.00 43 .40 21.85 24.00 36.50
19.20 38.70 41 .40 21 .70 25.45 31.90
16.85 37.55 34 .05 10.60 23.75 27.20
16.30 34.30 33 .40 17.10 22.60 24.75
16.10 34 .50 33.40 17.25 23 .55 27.45
15.35 34 .25 30.00 15.40 21 .20 27.25
23 .18 38.70 39 .04 23.51 20.49 36.52
17 .10 34 .60 31 .30 17 .30) 20.89 30.35
19.10 34 .50 37.35 18.80 21 .45 32.30
21 .60 32.75 40.05 20.50 22 .70 32 .05
1103.50 3505109     22.5 30.35
20.0031 .80  20.4 19452.0.4
24 .10 34 .85 30.90 24.55 23.60 31 .25
22.59 36.00 33 .40 24 .60 24.25 34.40
25.15 44 .35 38.40 20.35 28.70 42.35
24 .75 46.60 53.40 24 .85 31.20 41.30
24 .35 44 .00 48.40 24 .35 31 .65 42.80
20.85 44 .60 43 .40 27 .85 33.10 45.05
311.65 40.90 47.40 33.00 37.10 40.05
20.75 45.85 52.90 29.83 36.70 43.00
28.85 42.25 49.15 28.50 34 .85 42.00
I All prices liaseid on replorts of Wiseolisin pirice correspondlents o02
the 15t1h of ench month.
Annual prices are striglit averages of mronthly, dlita. For monthly data
prior to 10332 see
Bulletins 902, 1222, arid 1422, Wisconsin Crop orial L ivestock Reporting
Service.
I Broed on values of 1 gredienti in a typiceal Wisconsin poultry ration.
For further ex-
planlat~ion arid additiional Inontlrly (Iota consult Bulletin 140, page 25.
I1'oonds of poultry ration which could be purchased will, ten dozer eggs.
Wholeonle lirices in carlots f. o. h). Minneapolis plus freight to M odison.
IWhiolesale prices in carkots f.o. b. Chicago piso freight to Maldison.
Early Spring ILuilub, Crop of IfIY.5
The early sprcing lamp cr01) of 1535
in the pri nci pal early Irimbing areas is
a little smaller, probably 1 to 2 per-
cent, than the early crop of 1934 ac-
cordinrg to reports received by the De-
partment of Agriculture. The condi-
thin of the early lambs about March 1
thIs year averaged somewhat better
than did the 59114 early lambs at the
corresponding date. Except in Texas
rind Missouri, weather and feed condi-
tions in all of the early lambing states
have beci favorable. In California and
other Western States as a whole con-
ditions have averaged even more favor-
able than the relatively favorable sit-
iuation that prevailed up to March 1
las t year. In the Southerislern States
the ertrlly lambing sinison this year has
lbeen much nire favorable, ais regards
both weather conditions and feed sup-
lilies, than it was in 1934. In both
'1'exaq and Mlissouri feed supplies have
lien very short.
laricem of Wisconsin Farm Productin
Wisconsin prices of milk reached
1930 levels this month, after a rise of
7 cents per hundredweight over the
pirevious month toe $1.43 per hundred-
weight as an raverage for tall util iza-
tions for February. This rise occurred
contrary to a usual seasonal downturn
from January to February.
Milk delivered to condenseries show-
ed thi greatest gain by increasing
22cents over the priivedinrg month to
$1.55) per, hundredweight fur Februtiry.
Milk for use in butter arid cheese both
advanced 8 cents to $1.38 and $1.39, ri-
spictively. Milk utilized is market
milk rose 6 cents over the piriceding
month to $1.65 per hundredweight for
the. month of February.
The Index of prices received by Wis-
consin farmers for all ciimmodlties rose
from 301 percent for Jrtnuary to 107
percent of pre-war levels for February,
a rise of 6 points. Commodity groups
largely responsible for this rise in the
order of their importance are as fol-
lows: poultry products,, livestock, milk,
and unclassified groups. The grain
group declined 2 points from the pre-
ceding month. The 9 point rise In the
poultry products group was supported
by a substantial rise In both poultry
and egg prices. The 8 point rise in the
livestock group was supported by rises
in all types of livestock although the
largest gains were made by sheep and
beef cattle. The ratio of prices re-
ceived to prices paid rose to 84 percept
of pre-war for February, which repre-
sents an increase of 4 points above a
month earlier and a gain of 30 points
above the May 1932 low point of the
d epress ion.
United Stntex Farm Pricen
The index of prices received by farm-
ers of the United States increased 4
points to 111 percent of pre-war for
February.
Riises In the Indexes of the truc~k
crops, dairy products, meet anImals,
poultry piroducts, and fruit groups
were responsible for the increase which
occurred3 in Ihe Index of all commodI-
ties. The cotton and cottonseed group
reniained steady while the grain grotip
declined sliglifly.
Index of prices paid by farmers of
the United Slates for commodities
bought increased one point from the
preceding month to 127 percent of pre-
war foir Febrtrary. The ratio of prIces
received to prices paid rose from 85
percent for January to 87 percent of
pre-war for February. This level has
not been reached since January 1930.
Year
1910-14-
1914 ----
1915 ---
1916..--.
1917 ----
19180.-.
1919 -
1920:--
1922-
1923.._
1924..-.
1925 ---
1926..--
1927--
1928.--
1929 --
1930- -
1931 --
1932 ---
19335-.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar..
Apr.
May-
June.
July
Aug.-
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.-
Dec..-
1934 ---
Jan.
Feb..
Mar.
Apr.
May-
June-
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov..
Dec.-
1935--
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
I     2    3
I     $     $
7 .35 4 .91 7.23
7.65 5.83 8.22
6.55 5.421 7 .95
8.47 5.90 8.87
.4.17 7.52 11.46
.6.09 8.71 13.17
.6.52 9.0214.31
12.93 7.82 12.47
7.61 4.57 7.62
8.32 4.54 7.73
6.97 4.57 7.99
7.29 4.67 8.12
20.87 5.18 9 .12
11.70 5.73 10.14
9 .S2 0.45 10.52
8.74 8.22 12 .1
9.S9 8.32 12.4
8.82  8.54 9 .821
5.76 4.37 6.70
3.38 3 .027 4.60
3.44 2.85 4.31
2.55 2.45 3.42
2 .90 2 .212 4 .6
3.10 2.70 4.2!
3.10 2.702 3.81
3.90 32.50 4.22
3.80 3.402 4.12
3.90 3.222 4.42
3.70 32.10 4.71
3.70 11 .012 5.32
4.15 2.702 4.82
3.65 2.55 4 .52
2.80 2.302 3.52
4.12 2.01 4.51
2.90 2.63   3.92
3.80 2 .225 4.91
3.75 2.220 4.52
3.5O  3.10 4.22
3.102 3.15 4.42
3.25 2.190 3.91
3.80 2.75 3.92
4.45  2.75 4.41
6.00 3.222 5.41
5.00 2.223 5.41
4.95 2.83   4.82
4 .90 2.822 4.22
6.80 3.622 5.51
7.10 4.422 5.91
8. 23  5.012 6.60
__ - ------------------------------


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