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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XIII ([covers January 1934/December 1934])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XIII, no. 9,   pp. [33]-40 PDF (3.7 MB)


Page 37


WISCONSIN CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
production per cow that was reported
from states in the drought area. Milk
production data for Wisconsin and the
United States are given in the accom-
panying table.
In the area from Iowa, Illinois, and
Wisconsin   eastward,   production  per
cow as reported averaged higher than
on the same date in any year since
1929. In most of this area green corn
was being fed earlier than usual and
pastures were also being supplemented
Ivy grain and hay, partially in response
to better prices for market milk and
other dairy products. Outside of the
worst drought areas and some of the
South Central States, the proportion of
the milk cows reported in production
on September 1 was higher than on
that date in any of the past nine years.
Milk Production
Sept. 1,
Sept. 1 1934 as
Sept. I Sept. 1 li.:,-31 a % of
1934   1933   Av.   1933
Wisconsin
Per farm  ---- 223.5  207.9  229.1  107.5
Per c o w  in
herd _---15.12    14.30  15.51 105.7
Per cow milked 18.34  17.84  19.84 102.8
United States
Per c o w in
herd _---_-12.80  12.74  13.42 100.5
Milk Proldictlios Proeipeetm
So far in 1934, the level of milk pro-
dltctioIn tis indicated by crop corre-
slondleltts has been about 4 percent be-
loiw thee 19:3 produtction for the same
loiiiid. The increase in millk produc-
tiotn per cow ott September 1, as men-
tionetd above, is largely a result of ili-
C lease d atnd earlier feeding of green
cort iad some other home grown enster-
gettey feeds anid is a response to some
imprliovementt in milk prices. I'asture
(Oiiiiitiitio  Was improved in only lim ted
aireas t11 Septemtber 1 and farmers were
fell(ding iiuch less grain and concerit -
trates as cotnpltred   to  a year ago.
Pasttures are improving now as a result
of thle genetral rains. Appareintly more
thait the usual acreage is going into
rye ansd probaibly wiiter wvheat for ftlIl
atnd possibly slorng pasture which will
serlve to cut down the requirements for
otiler fedl and withi general Improve-
ment in palsture conditions a lobg fall
pasture season would have considerable
inltuence in mtsaittainittg the presenit
seasonttl level of m I I k    production
throough at part of this fall at least.
Chaicelm m lii Cow Nunmbers
WhIile purchases of cows by the Sur-
pluts lRelief Corporation have totaled
more thutu 40,000 heald in Wisconsitt this
is ttot very significant wlhen compared
to the total of altisost 2'% milliot, cows
otl ftrnms. The rVtte of mn ar k e tin g
through   this channel in some emer-
getncy drougltt lireals may inercase aifter
tht fall patstutre season but due to the
rustricteid .ittirte  of tlte  emergetlcy
tutIS tfrouis wlhichl cattle can be  sut,-
chatsed this type of milk cow marketing
will tnot be likely to affect inilk pro-
iluctiotn very greatly. So far in 1934
the movemenlit of X'isconsin cattle to
packer s a nd stoekyards, for compnira bIc
dalt, s, Itts beeci 29 percenit more thttn
iit  19.3. Ev dently  this  increase  in
Ittirketiligs has not been enouighi to off-
set replac nstit sitcte issilk cow  num-
belrs aIte at presenit aliparenitly greater
thatt ai year ago. If isatriketitigs of cat-
tli itcrealse  greatly  duritig  fall anld
winiter isiotiths, whon al plroiducer 1Ls
alny chloice ill thse tmatter, thlut pootrest
plrodtucintg couws still go to market anid
tltl feud thit is avtilable still be useud
1)y the issore etticicit allililals u hids Will
ti sld to hold the level of milk produc-
tiiit tibov  thlat wlhich issight be ex-
lictid with laiger nisarketinigs.
l'eed Priees up More 'TIshan Milk
The plrice of milk as compared to the
price of feed has bn cit quite uitfavor-
:ilde till thioL1gh1 1931 for both the Uni-
ted States andtul Wiscotssitt. For Atugust
100 pounduls of NVisConsill milk Wvould
, xchit ngi  fil   only   72  ittttflils  of  n
stiailda11 l  \V'wisco(isill  daily  l'lt iol  as
c'omIparIed  t) (31 poundl~s   ill Augu'1st llt
last  yinr,  1 deI linie  Orf  21  lot   lit  Iii  tiit
f,->t d buing ll  powerx of' Illlilk ats co>ll1pIIr t
\Vi I  21 it Y0'1 ago.  1)21i N' C('(1''1't t POiId-
eIItS iIIili L Itta 21 I IspIIIse to t1iS SitsII t-
tionl lly repor)0ting :1 (1--r1e~lse .ft 2i  )lwi-
Cenit ill tile altoilltt of gratill itol conll-
centrititeS  fed  p i  1110) pouidis  if Imilk
piroIdutiid Oil thiS  St'lteinlt l I tiC 1 ol (
pared to :a year" earlier.    N   ittially this
rJitll tie ll  iOLlk   in  til lt 1t. (c   itslf   ill
red'(lic'td flilic producllXtiOnl.
Thel( inlilki producI~tion leveX'l ill thl'. Ulll-
tel  States sO   br ii l1!:;4 hIt.s 1, l ,i about
I   lIe  i'I itt  lIess  tIl:, i   il l l;,:t. 1  ', ,I  Yllp-
plileS  ill  the  1iIItlit tiO   2   W Iu I II   t 11'1   1il1-
LISII II '  low   aiiid  ill  thle  1iliailj   i ittl'11 ei% '
'1  'l'hi y   I '(La ) iI'tit rlt l ayi hu ,  w ill ' te lt d t o-
ducltioni niaN,5 bes :np)lo' -i~lily 1mver(X   (itl,:
1:1 tA  W ill t all.   .ii  h eI li(  tl  It,.  I s   itli lt   V
btoe  t   eII11 Itl it i til i  itiil  d  ii  ii t ligit  O Ii  oil
Se p l'  t Illiw  It  ho  I t,  t  tu  I tillt  lilt  I  ill t)lt  it
kilitly  bet'  i              t     ll.
Th, nmlsjor tlihigs wvhich ll   ill tend~ to
Itigrltlst   th e  totat l   Illilltt rt in o \ i\ l  ill
W isu o nsin a d ring  tit'i fa ll  lis g u iit  Ii l to
1,1>1111).1art'( to  tilt! Swalil0  })('rio(  ,,f lalsl
y :tir 11't' the, Shorelt 1{  suppl~ e s, 11111 :1-
vorab11lef' illid prIic'.s Eits,((1})1 co p ll t, , ,, (I
])l'id' 'S   1 ) 21 1'()S )('tt fl s) I'  ( 1( Il  d-
crell'.S( ill tull fri't'ie4lliligS.  As Op)os~ (I
to   I II (' s '  ind~ica:ti(ollS  and1z  Im<ilt illg
t 0 \VN 11'A 11.1:i It t2Iiltied 01I' llighll(l Mlilki 1)1'Z'-
III1 t,,, [  Io s i,,,collpa,:1  1,, I t)lst 1':,11Iz111|
\\'fillter'l' I" :1(: Th'l,-  Ilarg,  IlIlt i'I'S1 s  of
.1" (.(11l farlits   etit , lai '  p l l  (Il   oil  o t   l,
copes, s(In.. poss   'le. invre'tll~,- ilk 111illi
price '.11coill jkgiligtb Ihetitiliz:lt im'l of v\ -
, 1'5' S('':ll  oft f'-d't'   and1 illiprl'ov'elliollt, ill
:l~t~lll'('S  W it I 1:Lt 11':i~t IL ,,11-,11 chmo-0,''
f'11'I-  t' lij'y  l~lig  r:,ll S(' Is(>II  It ILI)-
lw' IIS tha~t \\'I' Ila~y e,\pe',t 1 .... ilt hili-I'ยข
lighelt'l 11lilli prloduclt'ionl illn 's  iI~l
f,,, 1t \\lilie thils ftlil :IS -nlipilrhA Lo
lalst f.,ll, Nv i li  t u,- I)robit , :I iit) N, ,f :,
slack'inlg oiT als tll(  1,,   dt'O I' t,, -d be-
C(Mles 111      illt( 11sifii. 4.  Th'le  1t"vel of
CROP SUMMARY OF THE UNITED STATES FOR SEPTEMBER 1, 1934
Crop
Corn  --------
Potatoes  - - - - - - - - - - - -
Tobacco  -_- - - -  -
O ats  - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Barley  --- - - -  ---- - - - - - -
Rye  _
Winter wheat-
Durum wheat _
Spring wheat other than durumr
Buckwheat --
Flaxseed  -- - -- ---
Cabbage
Onions-
Tame hay ------------
Wild hay-
Pasture ------
Acreage
(000 omitted)
_I _       1
1934
Preliminary
92 .525
3.383
1,364
33 348
8 712
2 2Hi
32 485
i1 061
10 451
441
171
8:
53 A5
10 86.
1933
102.397
3.197
1 770
36 .704
10 .108
2 .35S
2 .446
2 ,310
16 762
461
1 .206
125
79
5t ,947
12 .315
Percent in-
crease (+) or
decrease (-)
of 1934 acreage
compared to
1933 acreage
- 9 .6
+ 5.8
-ZZ.9
-9.1
13 .8
-4 .2
+14 .2
-54 .1
-37 .7
- 3 .3
-11 .9
+40.0
+ 3 .8
- I .5
-11 .6
Prodution
(0t0t omitted)
Sept. 1. 1934               5-year
forecast      1933      oaeroge
1927 31
1,484602    2.343,883    2,516.307
337.141      320.363     365 6555
1,078,117   1 ,385.107   1,470.556
615 870     731,524    1,1869568
122 963     153.988      2709444
17.211l     21,216       40,959
400.522     351 603      632,061
6  .081     1610.19     61 .460
86,692     160,211      192,838
7,081       7,832        9,496
5.253       6,808       18,684
1.188         724        1 0102
22.403      21,553       23,7892
50.727      65 .983      72 250
5,237        8.633      11.368
Averoge Yiettl p2r Acre
1934
as a percent of
1933
63.3
105.2
77.8
74.6
78.3
81.3
113.9
37 .7
54 .1
90.2
77.2
164.1
103.9
76.9
61 .2
.   - - -
5-year
average
59 .0
92 .2
73.3
46.0
45.5
42.2
63 .4
9 .9
45.0
74.4
20.1
117.6
94.2
70.2
46.5
Unit
Bus.
Bus.
I Lbs.
Bus.
Bus.
Bus.
Bus
Bus.
Bus.
Bus.
Bus.
Tons
lBus.
lTans
1 Tons
To.
1934
16.0
99.7
790.
16.4
14.1
7 .6
12.3
5.7
8.3
15.8
4 .6
6 .8
273 .
.95
.49
43.1'
1933
22 9
100.2
783.
19 ,9
15 5
9 .0
12 .4
7 .0
9 .8
17.0
5.3
5 .8
272.
I .22
.70
53 .5l
In-yr.
10-yr.
overage
1922 31
25.7
112 .9
776.
30.1
22. 7
12 .4
15.2
12.1
12 .7
15.8
7 .3
7 .0
2 2 ,2
1.31
.83
72 .f1
l Condition September 1.     I 5-year average, 1928-1932.
37
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i
-
I
I
I
zI
z
5
5 I,5


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