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The banker-farmer news bulletin
(1920-1924)

Hulce, R. S.
The Banker-farmer news bulletin. Bulletin no. 23: fitting the dairy animal for dress parade PDF (1.3 MB)



with a mixture of equal parts of sweet oil, soap liniment and alcohol. A
mixture of goose
grease and sweet oil is also very good. These mixtures not only improve the
quality of
skin, but add a gloss to the hair and give the body a very clean appearance.
The mixtures
mentioned should not be applied to white hair on an animal later than 4 or
'5 days before
showing because of coloration. For grooming, a soft brush is advisable. Avoid
the use
of a curry comb except for the purpose of dirt that clings tightly.
               THE HORNS AND HOOFS NEED ATTENTION
   The horns must receive attention; very often the use of horn trainers
is necessary.
In preparing the horns, scrape down the rough portions by the use of a file.
The edge
of a broken piece of glass is sometimes used after filing. Be careful not
to make the skin
sore at the base of the horns. When the horns have been worked down nicely,
rub them
with emery cloth to put on a smooth surface. For polishing, fix up a paste
using sweet
oil, powdered pumice stone or tripoli and add a little alcohol. Apply this
paste mixture
to the horn and rub well with a woolen cloth. If the horns have been put
in good con-
dition before leaving home, polishing will be all that is necessary at the
fair. The hoofs
may be trimmed by use of pinchers followed by a rasp.
    It is necessary to do some clipping just previous to showing. This will
include the
tail above the switch and usually the ears, except in the case of Brown Swiss,
and
portions of the head or face and the belly.
                 TRAIN THE ANIMAL IN GOOD MANNERS
   A point often overlooked is that of breaking the animal to lead and to
stand properly.
If the efforts of the attendant are taken up in dragging and pushing an entry
about,
many of the good points which the animal might otherwise show are concealed.
An
exhibitor should have just one thought in mind while showing in the ring,
and that is to
give his entry every possible chance to show at an advantage. By this is
meant that
when his animal stands, its feet are properly placed, back straight and head
alert. Any
movement either on the part of the exhibitor or the animal should be as graceful
as
possible. A good animal poorly shown does not always get its just dues. "Keep
one
eye on the judge and the other on the animal" is the advice of experienced
showmen.
Until the ribbons are placed a good showman takes no chances of his animal
slumping
or going to sleep.
                                  BASE DATES
    In the dairy breeds the base dates for computing ages are August 1 and
February 1.
    A SENIOR YEARLING in the dairy breeds for the show season 1922 is one
dropped between August 1, 1920, and February 1, 1921.
    A JUNIOR YEARLING in the dairy breeds for the show season 1922 is one
dropped
between February 1, 1921, and August 1, 1921.
    A SENIOR CALF in the dairy breeds for the show season 1922 is one dropped
between August 1, 1921, and February 1, 1922.
    A JUNIOR CALF in the dairy breeds for the show season is one dropped
since
February 1, 1922.


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