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The banker-farmer news bulletin
(1920-1924)

Dinsmore, Wayne
The Banker-farmer news bulletin. Bulletin no. 18: the future of the horse industry PDF (1.1 MB)



     THE FUTURE OF THE HORSE INDUSTRY.
       By Wayne Dinsmore, Secretary, Horse Association of America.
   Breeding triumphs in horse production of the last fifty years answer the
question as to the future. The trend is toward specialization-definite breed-
ing to produce the conformation and qualities of intelligence, long life
and
endurance, which fit the animal for long, efficient service. The average
working life of the city drafter is now estimated at nine years; many individual
animals serve for seventeen. It is obvious that if there were more of the
latter
type, horses would be more in demand by city firms. Th same principle applies
to horses bought to use on farms.
           WISCONSIN HORSE POPULATION GROWING.
    Despite the multitude of so-called substitutes for animal power, there
are
more horses and mules in the United States today than ever before in history.
They total 27,283,413, according to the U. S. Government census of 1920.
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(The census of 1910 showed but 26,756,750 head.) As hitherto, a great majority
of them are on farms and ranches. To be specific, 92 per cent ire used
in agriculture; 8 per cent in cities, towns, villages and other non-agtictultural
lines. The horse and mule population of Wisconsin shows a gran4 total of
701,646 in the 1910 census, and 739,931 in the 1920 census, an increase of
38,M85
head. As it is primarily an agricultural state, the number used in agriculture
is more significant than the grand total. The 1920 census shows 687,648 horses
and mules on farms, an increase of 76,146 head, or 12.45 per cent over the
1910
total. Wisconsin is 14th in the list of states in the number of pure bred
horses
owned-3,230 pure bred horses of various breeds are reported-with a strong
predominance of the Percheron.
                SHORTAGE OF GOOD STOCK AHEAD.
    Production has stood at a low point for three years,-long enough to draw
off most of the surplus of mature animals existing in the country during
the
period. There is every prospect for a serious shortage of good work stock
in
the next two years and thereafter, and as it takes four years to bring on
a now
"crop," to minimum working age, the colts of last spring, next
spring, lnd
several seasons thereafter are going to find a market anxiousty waiting for
them,.when ready to go into the collar, provided they are the right kind,
tie
kind that is fitted for a specific line of work.
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