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University of Wisconsin / College of agriculture announcement of courses: 1942-1944

Departments of instruction,   pp. 203-223 PDF (5.6 MB)


Page 223


WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
  100. THESIS. Yr; 2 cr. Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor.
Staff.
  120. PARASITES OF DOMESTIC ANIMALS. I; 3 cr. Structure, life history, diagnosis
and prevention of parasites of the lower animals. Prerequisite: Zool. I or
Vet. Sci. 1.
Mr. Herrick.
  126. INFECTION AND IMMUNITY. II: 3 cr. An experimental study of the principles
of infection and immunity. Prerequisite: A course in bacteriology. Offered
1942-43
and alternate years. Mr. Hadley, staff.
  180. SPECIAL PROBLEMS. I, II; *cr. Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent
of
instructor. Staff.
  200. RESEARCH. Yr; *cr.     Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent
of in-
structor. Staff.
                        WiLDLIFE MAN.\GEMENT
PROFESSOR LEoPoLD, chairmzan.
  The courses in wildlife management are of two kinds: those intended to
give the gen-
eral student an understanding of wildlife as a natural resource, and those
intended to
train specialized students for professional practice.
  Course 118 is for the general student. Familiarity with common wild plants
and
animals and with farming practice is desirable as a basis for this course.
  Courses 161 and 200 are intended for professional students only, but Course
161 is
open to others who show special qualifications and need. A bi-weekly non-credit
sem-
inar is held for students enrolled in Courses 161 and 200.
  Professional training in wildlife management covers the animal conservation
field
and requires from two to five years of graduate work. The number of professional
stu-
dents accepted as candidates for an advanced degree in wildlife management
is limited
to five at one time, and these are recruited by selection. To be selected,
a student should
(1) have a bachelor's degree; (2) be proficient in the fields of ornithology,
field mam-
malogy, and field botany; (3) be skillful in reading evidence in the field;
(4) be able
to express himself clearly in writing; and (5) be familiar with land industries.
  Students desiring to prepare themselves for professional training should
major as
undergraduates in some biological field, such as botany, zoology, agronomy,
or soils.
  Information on assistantships and fellowships, available for those planning
to take
professional training in wildlife management, may be obtained by writing
to the Chair-
man of the Department of Wildlife Management.
  118. WILDLIFE ECOLOGY. II; 3 cr. Structure and properties of the animal
com-
munity; its relation to plants, soils, and land use. Field techniques; review
of problems;
history and economics of wildlife. Mr. Leopold.
  161. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES. I: *cr. Preparation of collections:
analysis of stomachs and pellets; sex and age determinations; censuses; trapping
and
banding; planting food and cover: analysis of data; carding literature. Prerequisites:
Wildlife Management 118 and consent of instructor. Mr. Leopold.
  200. RESEARCH. Yr; *cr. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of
instruc-
tor. Mr. Leopold.
223
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