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University of Wisconsin. College of Agriculture / Among ourselves: a house organ for the staff of the College of Agriculture
Vol. I (1923-1932)

Among ourselves: a house organ for the staff of the College of Agriculture: Vol. I. No. 11. June 21, 1923,   pp. [1]-2 PDF (862.9 KB)


Page [1]


      Ad ~~A HOUSE ORGAN FOR THE STAFF OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURF
      t 6          ~COLLEGE OF AGRICULTUREt                           / J
         ~~~UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN/<
Vol. 1. No. 11,                                                  June 21,
1923.
     A REVISION AND EXTENSION OF THE WISCONSIN SHORT COURSE is to be put
into
operation this coming fall.  The Board of Regents have just approved the
re-
cent action of the Agricultural Faculty with references to these changes.
     Under the new schedule the first year of woik in the Shcrt Course remains
virtually unchanged, but the second year is completely revised. The new sched-
ule reduces the number of hours of work and makes tnc coursos entirely elec-
tive for the second year, thereby permitting a greater dcgrce ot specializa-
tion.  Provision is also made for college credit if tho work is up to a certain
standard. By this plan Short Course students may e&ect a:: additional
winter
of work, making a three-year schedule.    With students posLessing necessary
en-
trance credits for Long or Middle Courses, credits for agricultural work
will
be allowed if standings are satisfactory.
     The specialization which the course now rmakes possible and the elective
nature of the work will undoubtedly make it more attracti'e to high school
boys and to men who have had training in county schools of agriculture or
equiv-
alent institutions.
     Since the course reduces materially the number of hours of work, especial-
ly for first year men, it is expected that it will result in a higher type
of
work generally, by allowing more time for- study and for work in the library.
     An effort has also been made to meet the changed con-it.ons in agriculture.
Shop work, which is now less essential on the farm because modern means of
transportation have greatly lessened the distance factor, ha3 been made elec-
tive, while the economic side of farming has been materillny strengthened
by
trebling the work in farm bookkeeping and increasing work in marketing and
gen-
eral economic problems,
     These changes are the natural outgrowth of the evolution that is occurring
in agricultural education.  When the Short Course was founded in the middle
eighties, scarclely any of the students had high school trarinig.    This
last
year, of the 193 in residence, 102 had had more or less hiL)h school preparation;
59 had had 3 years or more; and 6 had been in college or in normal school
work.
It is to be hoped that these modifications will still keep this course the
main educational feeder for the farm youth of the state who desire to secure
that type of training which will prove to be of value to them in assuming
the
rural obligations of the future.
     THE COLLEGE WILL BE HOST TO FARbERS ON STATION DAY, FRIDAY JUNE 22.
All
departments are participating in an excellent presentation of interesting
ex-
hibit material in the Stock Pavilion. Condition of field plots is now excel-
lent. The recent rains have put all crops in fine condition for showing the
work.  All staff members are urged to join our friends at the noon day lunch
in the woods by the lake.
     The presentation of the portrait of our colleague     R.A  Moore, will
be
made at the Hill Farm right after the noon lunch.     In this ceremony T.H.Campion,
president of the Wisconsin Experiment Association, will preside and Walter
Han-
chett of Sparta will be the principal speaker.   Dean Russell will accept
the
portrait on behalf of the Universety.


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