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University of Wisconsin. College of Agriculture / Among ourselves: a house organ for the staff of the College of Agriculture
Vol. I (1923-1932)

Among ourselves: a house organ for the staff of the College of Agriculture: Vol. I. No. 7. May 7, 1923,   pp. [1]-2 PDF (865.1 KB)


Page 2


2.
     OF THE 946 MEN ENTERING THE UNIVERSITY AS FRESM 1' in 1923,
93 or 9,8% were sons of farmers. In 1920 the number of farm
boys in the freshman class was 148, which was 15% of the 987 men
in that class.
     The financial depression which has hit agriculture sccms
to be very distinctly reflected in this dcclinc.   It may be
noted that the sons of merchants and business men makc up by far
the largest group in 1922, their number comprising over one-
third the total.  On the whole, the University rccords show
that the relative numbers of sons from the various occupational
groups have bccn fairly constant (with thc above exce-ption), the
largest relative increase coming from the homes of railway men.
     THE OLD FRIENDS OF PROF. W. A,. EE1TRY will be glad to know
that his health is better this spring than it has been for
several years.  Prof. Morrison has just returned from a short
visit with hire at his seaside home near Sarasota, Florida,
     THE WIORK OF THE SEID INSPECTION laboratory in the Agronomy
Buildin- has exceeded in amount that done up to the same date in
any year since 1915. Over 4,100 samples have already been run,
most of them requiring both purity and germination tests. Ap-
prarcntly it will be the biggest year in the history of the seed
inspection laboratory,  The number of clover samples is running
unusually high this season, being nearly 2/3 of the total. The
amount of buckhorn in the clover is alarming and, according to
A. L. Stonc, it seriously menaces the clover seed industry in
'Ti sc onsin.
     A MOST SUCCESSFUL COUNTY SHORT COURSE FOR '7O\2N was held
last week at WJausau by Hiss Vangcl Russell, Home Dcmonstration
.Agent for Marathon County.  Forty country girls spent the entire
week in gaining an insight into home development that will mean
much to the country life of that portion Of the state.
     RECOGNITION OF THE SERVICES OF PROF, H. F. WILSON in bee
culture came to him recently in his being selected as president
of the American Honey Produoers League.
     WISCONSIN' STRAINS 0F YELLOWS-RESIST.UAT CABB.BGE SEED are now
being grown in large quantities for usc in all infected areas of
the U. S. The first of these was distributed fror the departmer
of Plant Pathology in 1915. Resistant strains of three distinct
varieties -re now in use and three others of the earlier types
are in process of development.   Through a cooperative arrangement
between the Office of Cotton and Truck Diseases, U.S. Department
of Agriculture, and the National Kraut Packers' Association with
the De-artmcnt of Plant Pathology, specially selected stock seed
produced under supervision in the Racine district is each year
being placed for contract growing in the cabbage seed growing
district of Puget Sound in Washington,
     Two pounds of Wisconsin All Seasons stock seed so placed in
1920 brought back 3,400 pounds of seed in 1921. This amount,
sufficient to plant 10,000 to 15,000 acres of csa.bago, was dis-
tributed practically at cost from Kansas to the Atlantic Sca-
board in le2z-2. It gave uniformrly high yields on ycllows-sick
soil, where ordinary varieties 'suffered severe losses.
(Items for this House Organ should be sent to H. L. Russell)


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