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University of Wisconsin. College of Agriculture / Among ourselves: a house organ for the staff of the College of Agriculture
Vol. I (1923-1932)

Among ourselves: a house organ for the staff of the College of Agriculture: Vol. I. No. 3. Mar. 28, 1923,   pp. [1]-3 PDF (1.2 MB)


Page 3


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   work in every phase of the activities of the university and college
   and particularly in research....No distinction is made between men
   in instruction, research, or extension......The university believes
   that it is advantageous for men to engage in all three of these
   activities and that no one of them may be set above or below the
   others.
     RELATIVE TO THE VALUE OF SHORT COURSE TYPE of instruction, they
say:
     'The University of Wisconsin has a notable winter course in gen-
   eral agriculture.r..This course (referring to this type of instruc-
   tion) is an agency for the betterment of the social and economic
   conditions of rural life. It should be fostered by the agricultur-
   al college, for it meets a need the regular course of the college
   can never fill and stabilizes conditions in the industry which the
   college serves."
     RELATION OF REGULATORY AND EDUCATIONAL WORK. They found general
agreement in the policy which Wisconsin has developed in the inter-
relation between the state departments of agriculture and the agricul-
tural colleges regarding the line of cleavage between educational ac-
tivities, police, and regulatory functions. Indiana (Purdue) was the
only institution that held to the idea that the college of agriculture
was the logical place to lodge the regulatory work in agriculture.
     STUDENT ENROLL1ENT.   Comment vas made on the fact that they found
reduced student enrollment in practically all colleges they visited.
     "....but the disappointment of California at the comparatively
   small enrollment in its agricultural college is shared by every
   state which we visited, no matter what the type of institution in
   it.  The more the commission studied this problem the more it was
   convinced that the problem of increasing enrollment in agricultural
   colleges and keeping boys on the farm is not to be solved by changes
   in curriculum, equipment, or method, but by the betterment of the
   social and economic conditions of rural life. No plan which leaves
   this out of major consideration is going to succeed in keeping
   farmers' sons in great numbers on the farm or in attracting the sons
   of city dwellers to it. This is the great work of the college of
   agriculture today, and in it the University of California has no
   superior so far as we could find."
     AGRICULTURAL COMMISSIONS OF THE AMERICAN BANKERS ASSOCIATION re-
presenting the seventh Federal Reserve District (including Ilichigan,
Inediana, Illinois, Iovra, and Wisconsin) met last week at the College
for the purpose of formulating plans for the coming season. Heretofore,
this organization has interested itself in agricultural problems in a
national way; mainly, through the issuance of the BAiKER-FAR.BR maga-
zine. The cooperation of the agricultural colleges is further sought
through the establishment of an ADVISORY COUNCIL from the colleges.
President Jardine of Kansas and Deans Dodson of Louisiana and Russell
are to serve in that capacity this year. Plans are to be effected at
the national meeting of the several state committees at West Chester,
N. Y., in April.
(Items or suggestions for the House Organ should be sent to H.L.Russell)


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