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The Aeroplane
(1914)

Literary,   pp. 8-18


Page 9

THE     AEROPLANE                               9 
ing nothing to do, so she picked up a book from a table nearby, and began
to read it. 
The book proved so interesting, and she was so absorbed in it, that she forgot
her uncle. 
When she was almost through with the story she began to feel hungry. She
closed 
the book anxiously. Not one person was in sight, except the tieket agent.
The station 
was deserted, and it was long past noon. She looked all through the station.
Her uncle 
was not there. 
Pearl turned to go, penniless and alone in the largest city in the United
States. 
Amazement gave way to fear, and Pearl could scarcely keep from bursting into
tears. 
Then she thought of her locket. Was not this a time of urgent need? She sat
down 
again and took off the locket. She examined it, and tried to find an opening,
but could 
not. At any rate the locket itself was worth something. She walked out into
the streets, 
in search of a jeweler. 
The crowded streets surprised her. She had imagined New York crowded, but
oh! 
nothing like this. Countless automobiles and trucks whizzed by. A few lumbering
horses were trying to plow their way through. Bicycles and motorcycles squeezed
in and 
out among the confused mass of vehicles, while on both sides of the streets
anxious 
faces were seen, and people trying to get across the streets. The huge buildings
shut off 
the bright light of the sky, and gray smoke curled over the city. 
Pearl approached a policeman and asked, pointing to the sign, "Bellem
Co.-Fine 
Jewelers," "Do they buy jewelry?" "Well, I don't know,
but you can try and find out," 
he answered. 
She went to the door, hesitating to enter. The diamonds and other jewels
in the win- 
dow fairly dazzled her, and she seemed to be in a dream. She almost felt
her way up to 
the door and to one of the counters. A brisk kind-looking young clerk came
up to her, 
and she suddenly woke up. She handed the clerk her locket and told her story;
how she 
came to New York, that she could find no opening to the locket, and that
she wanted 
to sell it. 
He looked at her doubtfully, and then her frankness reassured her. 
He went to a small desk farther back, and Pearl looked around at the rich
sights near 
her. Soon the young man returned, radiant. "What's the use of your selling
the locket? 
Why not sell this?" and he held up a large beautiful diamond. "I
found it in your locket. 
I was polishing it and I happened to touch this emerald hard" (he pointed
to one of the 
small emeralds in the middle of the locket) "and the case sprung open.
This ought to 
be worth something. I will give you five hundred dollars down, and whatever
else it 
brings at the sale. Yes it's worth it; don't be afraid to take the money."
Pearl took the money and agreed to come the next evening to close the sale.
Then 
she went to a hotel which the clerk recommended. 
In the evening the clerk went to a dinner party at a friend's house. After
dinner he 
was telling of his purchase to a group of men, and how Pearl was coming for
the rest of 
the money the next night, and he took the locket out of a pocket to show
them, when one 
of them exclaimed, "Well, I believe that is my niece's locket, or else
its twin. who did 
you say sold it to you?" 
The clerk described Pearl "Well, now, that is my niece! Where is she?
How did 
she get here, and why?-oh, yes. I know now. Oh! I forgot all about the fact
that she 
was coming to New York. Lucky I had to come on business! You say she is coming
to 
your store tomorrow night to get the sale money? At six o'clock? Well, you
tell her you 
sold the locket, and I'll be there in time to see her." 
Saturday evening, a few minutes before six, Pearl presented herself at the
store, 
doubtful as to whether her diamond was sold or not. 
The clerk came up to her, saying, "I sold your diamond and your locket,
both, and 1 
got a pretty big price for them, too. You couldn't guess-well, and there
comes the pur- 
chaser now." 
Pearl turned around just as the judge came up to him. 
She hurried to him. "What, you!" she exclaimed. "Oh, uncle,
I'm so glad you came," 
and she gave him a genuine bear hug. 
MYRTLE A. RAYMAKER, '17. 


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