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Wisconsin Cheese Makers' Association / Proceedings of the Wisconsin Cheese Makers' Association forty-fourth annual convention November 13, 14, 1935 assembled in the City of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
(1936)

Hillstad, A. C.
Quality goods,   pp. 23-25 PDF (667.5 KB)


Page 23


FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CONVENTION
QUALITY GOODS
By MR. H[LLsTAD
Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen: I would much prefer being
down there on the floor because I feel I would be much more on the
level with you folks down there. I am a butter maker with some almost
74 years experience, so that really instead of being on a speaker's
platform like this I would rather prefer being down there.
I have been attending conventions and meetings-well, it wasn't
hardly a week for possibly 16, 18, 20 weeks that I wasn't in some kind
of a meeting down there and in the last six weeks I haven't missed
being at some convention or other, so that I am almost "conventioned"
to death, as a fellow said.
I have attended conventions in Minnesota, Iowa, the National Dairy
Show at St. Louis, and of course, our own state convention and one or
two others, and the main topic has been, The Quality Problem. That
Is what we have been hearing; that is what I have been hearing for
the last 34 years. As I said, 34 years ago, why It was the quality
problem and It has been that ever since.
I have wondered a great many times whether we really are accom-
plishing what we really should along this line. I cannot help but
believe that we are responsible-I say we, and when I say we I mean
the operators of the cheese factories and the creameries-that we are
somewhat to blame ourselves for not having the quality that we de-
serve in making quality goods for Wisconsin.
Now, why I make that statement is this: That being an operator
myself, I know that there has been many a can of cream come into
my plant and many a can of milk that I should not have taken in.
But why did I take it? I simply took it because I didn't have the
protection that I was entitled to have and that was the other fellow
in taking it in. Now we are In hopes of having some kind of a ruling
or some kind of legislation although I don't believe In legislating
ourselves Into a quality program. That is one thing I don't hardly be-
lieve in. There may be some things along legislation that we can
get some good out of but, after all it is going to be up to the industry
as a whole to co-operate and put the program across themselves. In
other words, it is going to be up to the operator to put a program
across that is going to be a credit to Wisconsin.
On my trip to St. Paul last March I had the privilege of sitting in
with the National Board of the National Butter Makers and during
the evening one of the directors and myself went on a sort of window
shopping tour. We just took a walk, possibly a mile or mile and a
half through the business section of St. Paul and there were two or
three window displays there of cheese and some butter, but mostly
cheese; and to my surprise one window was practically all stamped
or marked "Wisconsin Cheese." But I will tell you this,
gentlemen,
that I wasn't proud of that exhibit. The quality wasn't there, the
make-up of the package wasn't there. I am not criticizing; I don't
want you to feel I have got any malice in my heart toward the cheese
industry because I have not. I am perfectly willing to work with


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