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Randall, Geo. A. / Illustrated atlas of Winnebago County, Wisconsin : containing outline map of the county, map of each township in the county, with village and city plats. Also maps of the world, United States and state of Wisconsin, together with other valuable information
(1889)

Personal sketches,   pp. [unnumbered]-56 PDF (67.4 MB)


PERSONAL SKETCHES.  [page 16]
TOWN OF ALGOMA.
  WILLIAM AGNEW (deceased) was born in Scotland in 1803, son of John
and Jennett Agnew. In 1829 he removed to New Brunswick, where he re-
mained twenty-two years, and then emigrated to America and settled in
the town of Algoma, where he remained until his death, which occurred in
1869. In 1832 he was united in marriage with Agnes McCullouch, also a
native of Scotland, and their family numbered eleven children, four of
whom are living: Agnes, Sarah, William J., and Ellen Ruth. He and wife
were both members of the Presbyterian church. He was a man well liked
by all his neighbors, and was one of the leading citizens of his town. 
William J., the youngest son, lives now with his mother, now in the seventy-
fifth year of her age, on the old homestead. He was born in New Bruns-
wick, but came here when quite young, where he received a common
school education. In July, 1888, he was united in marriage with Edith
Sheffer. He is now one of the board of supervisors of the town. He is one
of the leading young farmers of his town, and is well respected by all.
  JOHN ATHEARN, one of the leading farmers of Algoma town, Winnebago 
county, was born in Maine in 1839, and is the son of Robert and
Martha Athearn, of whom more extended mention is made in the sketch of
George W. Athearn of Oshkosh. He was reared in his native state, and
given a public school education. He came to Wisconsin in 1866, and with
his brother engaged in farming near the city of Oshkosh, at which he has
since continued. For several years he has been extensively engaged in the
dairy business, being a member of the Algoma Creamery Co., and manager
of the same, which is located on his farm. Mr. Athearn has served two
terms on the county board of supervisors, and is, and has been for years,
one of the prominent citizens of his town. He was married in 1865 to Miss
Jenny Westman, of Madison, Maine, who was born in 1846. Two children
have been born to the union: Gracie W. and Lester J.
  WILLIAM BEDIENT, a highly esteemed old settler, is a native of New
York state, born in 1818, son of Zalman and Sarah Bedient, of Dutch and
French descent. He remained in his native state until twenty-six years
of age, when he moved west and settled in Wisconsin. He worked out
until he accumulated enough money to buy eighty acres of land, when,
in 1848, he purchased the farm where lie now lives. In 1841 he was mar-
ried to Esther Lockwood, and six children were bestowed upon them, three
of whom are living: Harris, Mary and Hattie. Mrs. Bedient was born in
1816. He was the first commissioner of the highway, and served about
four years. He officiated about twentv years on the school board. His un-
failing industry and good management have won for him a pleasant home,
which has a commanding view of the beautiful Lake Winnebago. The
eighty acres which he first bought was among the earliest land sold.  His
conveyances since have left him about thirty-seven acres.
  JOHN BONGERT, a worthy farmer, was born December 23, 1836, son of
Philip and Anna Bongert, both natives of Germany. He was raised in
Germany until seventeen years of age, when he emigrated to America and
first stopped in Chicago where he worked as a laborer about one year,
removed to Wisconsin and settled at Hortonville where he continued to
work as a day laborer, until 1859. He then bought a farm in Outagamie
county and remained there twelve years. He then traded that farm for the
one upon which he now lives. At the tender age of twelve years he began
to earn his own living as a day laborer. In 1861 he was united in marriage
with Lucia Miller, and they have had four children, three of whom are now
living: Mary, John A. and Matthias. The mother was born in 1833. He and
wife are both members of the Catholic church. He has served on the board
of supervisors. By hard work and good management he has made a success 
of this life and now owns eighty acres of well improved land with a two
story house and good barn.
  CHARLES BUHRING is a native of Germany, born in 1849, son of
George and Mary Buhring. He came with his parents to America when
only four years of age, and settled in Wisconsin. He never had the 
advantage of much schooling, but has become well informed in business 
matters. At the age of eighteen years he began life for himself as a day
laborer,
and by hard work and close economy he accumulated enough money so
that in 1876, he bought the farm where he now lives. In 1876, he married
Ellis Doyle, by whom he had five children: Mary, Charles, Ella, Daniel and
infant. Mrs. Doyle was born in 1855. He has served on the school board
of his town three years. He now owns fifty-two acres of good land, is one
of the reliable citizens of his town and is well respected by all.
  A. A. BUNTEN, a leading citizen of Algoma town, is a native of New
Brunswick, born in 1838, son of Alonzo and Isabelle C. (Ferson) Bunten. The
father was a native of New Brunswick of Scotch descent, and the mother of
Maine, of English descent. The mother, who makes her home on the farm
near her son, is now in her seventy-fourth year. In 1863 Mr. Bunten was
united in marriage with Pauline Bippus, born in 1848, daughter of Christian
and Francis Bippus. In 1861 he enlisted in Company A, First regiment
of Wisconsin infantry, under Capt. John C. Goodrich, served three years
and four months and received an honorable discharge at Indianapolis, Ind.,
in 1864. He became first sergeant of his company, and was wounded
three times at the battle of Stone River. He has served on the school
board of Algoma about twenty-four years, also on the town board one year.
He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. lodge, No. 120, at Oshkosh. He is also
a
member of the G. A. R.
  JAMES CALWELL, an old settler of Wisconsin, now one of the leading
farmers of Algoma town, is a native of New York, born in 1820, son of
Samuel and Nancy (Coman) Calwell. The father was a native of Vermont,
and the mother, of New York. The grandfather served in the Revolution-
ary war, and was of the old Mayflower lineage. James lived in New York
until 1844, when he emigrated to the west and settled in Wisconsin, mak-
ing the trip overland by teams. He first settled in Walworth county, where
he remained about five years; then he came to Winnebago county and 
entered 120 acres, where he cleared a farm and lived eighteen years, after-
ward purchasing and moving to the farm where he now lives. When he
first came to Wisconsin it was in the territorial days, and he suffered all
the hardships of a frontier life. At the age of twenty he began to earn his
own living as a sailor on Lake Erie, running from Buffalo to Detroit on
the steamer Ben Franklin, under Capt. Appleby. In 1845, he was united
in marriage to Emily Freeman, daughter of George and Elizabeth (Connor) 
Freeman, born in 1826. They had three children: Eunice, William
and Jessie May. Mrs. Calwell is a member of the First Baptist church of
Oshkosh. He served as chairman of the board of supervisors of his town
three years, and resigned the office and removed to Oshkosh for the pur-
pose of schooling his children. He also served two terms on the school
board of his district. During the war he volunteered for the company 
commanded by Capt. G. Bouck, the first company organized in Oshkosh, but
on examination was rejected. His handsome farm in Algoma town in-
cludes 160 acres of fine farming land, with good and substantial buildings.
EARL S. CHASE, a native of Maine, was born in 1832, son of Edmond
and Anna Chase. In 1853, he emigrated and settled in Wisconsin, where
he remained until 1880. He then removed to Minnesota, and after four
years returned to Wisconsin, and settled on the farm where he now lives.
In 1858, he was united in marriage with Sarah J. Cotton, and they had
two children, Loanza and Florence, both deceased. Florence was born in
1867, died in 1872; Loanza was born in 1861, died in 1876. The mother of
these children was born in 1840, and died in 1884. He adopted a child -
Edna Woodard. His farm embraces eighty acres of excellent land in the
town of Algoma, and as a farmer and citizen he is in good repute. He is
preparing his farm for dairy purposes, and makes a specialty of the Jersey
cattle.
POMEROY CONVERS, a native of Ohio, was born in 1822, son of Lyman
and Martha Convers. He remained in Ohio until fifteen years of age,
when he went with his parents to Michigan, ad remined about five
years, afterward returning to Ohio, where he lived until 1848, when he
settled at Racine. A year later he removed to the town of Algoma and
settled on the farm where he now lives. In 1843 he was married to
Prudence Foss, by whom he had eight children, six now living: Martha,
James F., Cynthia, Emeline, Elwin, Edwin. The mother was born Feb-
ruary 11, 1826, and departed this life October 27, 1888. He has prospered
through life, and now possesses a good farm of 119 1/2 acres in Algoma town.
He is one of the pioneer farmers of his town and is highly respected. He
served on the school board twenty years; one year as clerk, and nineteen
as
treasurer.
  SIDNEY GUNNING (deceased), was a native of England, born in 1822.
In 1848 he emigrated to America, and first settled in Waukesha county, this
state, where he remained one year and then came to the town of Algoma
where in 1857, he bought and settled on the farm which he occupied until
his
death in 1872. In 1847 he was united in marriage with Betsy Baker, and
they had five children, three of whom are living: Frederick, Bert and Ella.
He came to America almost penniless and by his earnest efforts carved out
of the forests a beautiful home for his children, and left to his family
a good
farm of 120 acres.
  ALBERT GUNNING, son of the above, was born in 1853, in the village
of Algoma, but was raised on the farm on which he now lives. He received
a common school education and attended the business college at Oshkosh,
from which he graduated in 1875. In 1881 he was united in marriage
with Ettie Lowery, and they have three children: Sidney, Charles and
Bessie. He is a member of the school board of his district. He makes a
specialty of dairying and has a herd of thirty-four cows.
  REV. ROBINSON HENRY, a retired minister and highly respected citi-
zen, is a native of New York state, born in 1823. son of George and Nancy
(Naylor) Henry, the father of German, and the mother of Scotch, descent.
When eleven years of age, he accompanied his parents west, and settled in
Ohio, on what was known as the western reserve, where he remained until
1856, when he again removed to Wisconsin. He received a common school
education and attended three terms at the Western Reserve Seminary. In
1843, he was united in marriage with Laura J. Davis, born in 1823, and
they were given four children: Mercelon E., Clarence L., Florence E. and
Alice A. Florence E. departed this life in 1883. In 1840, he entered the
ministry in which he continued about fourteen years. He had charge of
the work at Oconto three years, at Waukesha and Eureka three years, at
Winneconne two years, at Clemansville three years, Weyauwega one year,
Princeton one year and at Dartford one year. He then gave up the min-
istry and retired to the farm, where he now lives. He has served on the
town board of his town eight years as its chairman, and ten years in all.
He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. Oshkosh lodge, No. 120. He now owns
101 acres of land in this town, and is one of its leading citizens.
  WILLIAM C. HUBBARD a prominent farmer of Algoma, is a native
of Illinois. He was born in 1826, and is the son of Peter and Martha Hub-
bard, the father of Welsh and English, the mother of Irish descent. He
lived in Illinois until 1846, when he moved to Wisconsin and settled on the
farm he now occupies. In 1853 he was married to Helen Scovil, and this
union was blessed with two children, both of whom died in infancy. His
wife, Helen, was born in 1834, and died in 1861. In 1865 he was married
to Mrs. Rosa Blinn, by whom he had two children, of whom one is living,
Belle. He and wife are both members of the Methodist Episcopal church.
He has served on the town board five or six years, as town treasurer two
years, and as town assessor four years in succession, and has served on the
school board ten or twelve years. He was chairman of the town board two
years. He is a member of the G. A. R. post at Oshkosh. In 1862, he en-
listed in Company C, Twenty-first Regiment Wisconsin volunteers, and
served until 1865, when he was mustered out at Milwaukee as second 
lieutenant. He now manages his pleasant farm of eighty-five acres in Algoma,
which is provided with good and substantial buildings.
  WILLIAM A. JOHNSON is a native of New York state, born in 1830, son
of Ambrose and Sophia (Kettch) Johnson, the father of English, and the
mother of Dutch, descent. His home was in the state of New York until
1849, when he emigrated west and settled in Oshkosh. In 1850 he began
work for Philetus Sawyer as overseer in the saw-mill, and so continued
twenty-nine years. Afterward he purchased and removed to the farm
where he now lives. He received a common school education. At the
age of fourteen years he began work for himself, serving an apprenticeship
at the tanner's trade. In 1858, he was united in marriage with Sarah J.
Haughlin, born in 1839, and they have had seven children, five of whom
are living: Mary, Violette, Ella, Olive M. and Edgar. He served on the
board of supervisor two years, on the school board nine years, and is held
in high esteem by the people of his town. He has a pleasant home of forty-
five acres of well improved land.
  NATHAN JOHNSTON, a prosperous farmer of Algoma, is a native of
Maine, born in 1826, son of James and Martha Johnston. In 1856 he re-
moved to Wisconsin and settled in Oshkosh, where he embarked in the
lumber business, in which he remained about fifteen years, when he retired
to
the farm where he now lives. In 1856 he was married to Victory Snell,
born in 1833, by whom he had three children, two of whom are now living:
Ella M. and Charles E. Mr. Johnston began at the bottom of the ladder of
fortune, but has made a success of life, and now owns 250 acres of very
fine farming land in Algoma with good and substantial buildings. At one
time he raised the short horn cattle. He ih interested in the Algoma 
creamery, and keeps seventeen milch cows.
JOHN N. KIEL, an old and well-known citizen of Winnebago county,
residing in a beautiful residence on Lake Butte des Morts, is a native
of Germany, where he was born in 1828, the son of George and Mary Kiel.
He came with his parents to America in 1842, and located in Franklin
county, Penn., but in 1850 he came west and located in Milwaukee. In I860O
he removed to Oshkosh, and after living in the city for twenty years he re-
moved to the farm where he now resides. He is a butcher by trade, and
followed that calling in both Milwaukee and Oshkosh with success. While
a citizen of Oshkosh he served as alderman from the Third ward for two
years, and since residing on the farm has served one year as a member of
the county board of supervisors from Algoma town. His farm contains 173
acres, all in a high state of cultivation, upon which he raises a variety
of
products and considerable live stock. His residence, a two story brick
building, is situated immediately upon the shore of Lake Butte des Morts,
and is one of the handsomest farm residences in the county. The out
buildings are good and substantial, and the improvements of the farm are
in first class condition. Mr. Kiel is what may be termed a self-made man.
He came to this country a poor man, but by careful management he has
succeeded well, and to-day is regarded as one of the leading and substan-
tial citizens of Winnebago county. Besides his farm of 173 acres he owns
two good brick business houses and two substantial dwellings in Oshkosh.
He was married in 1860 to Lena Reider, who was born in 1832. She is a
member of the Lutheran church, and is a lady highly respected. The life
Mr. Kiel has lived has been one of honesty and uprightness, and to-day
probably no citizen in the county stands higher or has more friends than
he, among the most prominent people.
  GEORGE Y. KNAPP is a native of New York, born in 1818, son of
Daniel B. and Betsy Knapp. He was raised in New York state, where he
remained until 1852, when he came west and first settled in Oshkosh. Two
years later he bought and settled on the farm where he now lives. In 1840
he was united in marriage with Phila L. Cushman, born in 1821, and they
had seven children, six of whom are now living: Elizabeth, Sarah, Irving,
Ella, Georgiana and Ettie.  Mrs. Knapp is a member of the Methodist
Epicopal church. He served as treasurer of the town board four years,
and on the school board fifteen or sixteen years  He now owns 160 acres
of good farmng land in Algoma, with good substanial buildings.    He is
now one of the oldest citizens of Algoma and is held in general esteem.
  JOHN G. H. KUSCHE (deceased), one of the fist settlers of Os kosh, h,
emigrated from  Germany in 1854. He remained at Oshkosh until 1879,
when he bought and settled on the farm in Algoma town, where his widow
now lives, and where he died in 1888.  He was engaged in the lime business
in Ohskosh, and so far succeeded tht he was able to leave his family 100
acres of excellent land well improved.  He was one of the elading farmers
of his town, and in his death the community lost a good and worthy cit
zen. His son Reinhold, born in 1857, now owns and resides on the old
homestead. He received a good education and entered the business college
of W. W. Daggatt and graduated after four terms. In 1881 he was married
to Minnie E. Backhaus, born in 1857, and they have one child--Elsie. He
is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., at Oshkosh, No. 179. He is one of theXW&
in young farmers of his town.
  FRANK LAST is a native of Prussia, born in 1832, son of John and
Louise Last. Our subject was raised in Prussia, and remained there until
1861, when he emigrated to America and settled in Wisconsin. In I864, he
removed to Oshkosh, and worked as a laborer, and in 1872, bought the
rock quarry near Oshkosh, where he worked about sixteen years, and had
a large and profitable business. In 1857 he was married to Amelia Kanck,
born in 1833, and this union gave them nine children: Lalraith, Theodore,
Frank, Phenie, Matilda, Edward, Herman, Anna and Henry. He and
wife are members of the Lutheran church. By good management and
close economy he has made a success of this life. He owns 135 acres of
good farming land in Algoma town, adorned with a handsome two-story
house just completed, with a commodious barn. He also owns 160 acres in
Vinland town, and 160 acres in Langlade county. In addition to his agri-
cultural interests he takes considerable interest in fine stock of all kinds.
  EZEKIEL McILROY (deceased), was a native of Ireland, and came to
America in 1855 and settled on the farm where his family now resides,
where he lived until his death, which occurred in 1875. He came to
America without any capital whatever, but by honest industry suceeeded
in making a pleasant home for his family, and at his death owned fifty-
nine acres of good land in the town of Algoma, with comfortable build-
ings. He was united in marriage with Cynthia J. Wilson, and thi union
was blessed with eleven children, eight of whom are now living: John,
Ellen, Emma, Samuel, Minerva, Maggie, Aggie and Allie, He and wife
were both members of the Presbyterian church. He was one of the lead-
ing farmers of the town during his lifetime, and was highly respected by
all who knew him.
  RODERICK McKENZIE (deceased), was one of the old settlers of Win-
nebago, and was a resident of Oshkosh about thirty years. He was one of
the successful business men of the city during most of his life, but about
1874 he retired to the farm where he lived until his death, which occurred
in 1886. At the time of his death he was reckoned among the wealthy and
prominent citizens of Winnebago county. William McKenzie, his nephew,
who now lives on the farm, is a substantial farmer and prominent among
the citizens of Algoma town. He is a native of Scotland, born in 1845.
He lived in Scotland until 1882, when he emigrated to America and settled
on his present farm. In 1870 he was married to Isabelle L McKenzie, born
in 1847, and they have had three children. He and wife are members of
the Presbyterian church. His farm includes eighty acres of excellent
farming land which is supplied with good and substantial buildings.
  EVAN OWENS is a native of Wales, born in 1818, son of John and
Ann Owens. He remained in his native land until 1849, when he emi-
grated to America, and stopped in Pennsylvania, where he remained one
year, then coming to Winnebago county. He first settled at Neenah, and
remained six years, and then moved to the town of Oshkosh, which was
his home for nine years. At the close of that period he came to the town
of Algoma, and settled on the farm where he now lives. In 1843, he was
united in marriage with Sarah Morris, daughter of Edward and Margaret
Morris.,born in 1820, and their family included eleven children: John,
born May 1, 1844; Edward, March 18, 1846; Evan, January 12 1848  Will-
iam D., July 12, 1850; Richard F., August 25, 1852; Margaret A., August
23, 1854; Robert T., September 28, 1856; Samuel H., April 4, 1858; Sarah
E., June 15, 1860; Mary J., July 11, 1862; Harriet E., March 21, 1865.  He
and wife are members of the Welsh Congregational church. He has
served on the board of supervisors of his town two terms, and on the
school board three years. With his agricultural pursuits, he makes a
specialty of raising short-horn cattle. He owns 110 acres of land in
Algoma, well improved, with good and substantial buildings and eighty
acres of hay land in Winnecoune.
  ANTON OKRUEG, a wealthy farmerof Algoma, is a native of Germany
born in 1824, son of Jacob and Anna Okrueg, was raised in Germany and
lived there until 1852, when he emigrated to America. He first settled in
New York, where he remained about one and one-half years, and then came
to Oshkosh. In 1876, he removed to the farm where he now lives In
1854, he was united in marriage with Rosina Retzack, born in 1838 and
this union resulted in ten children: Frank, Lena, Julia, Gust, Theodore
Anna, Sophia, George, Lydia and Charles. He and wife are bo  mem
bers of the Catholic church, He owns 100 acres of fine farming land in 
Algoma, which is under a good state of cultivation with a comfortable home
commanding a view of Lake Butte des Morts.
  SEBASTIAN OSTERTAG was born in Germany in 1839, a son of Valentine 
and Mary A. Ostertag. He left his native land at the age of eight
years, and with his parents emigrated to America and settled In
Nekimi town. The father and mother now live with Sebastian, the
father in his seventy-seventh year, and the mother aged seventy-four years.
The father came to this country a poor man,  but made for himself an honest
name and gained a fair share of this world's goods. Sebastian received a
common school education, and in 1865 he began business in Oshkosh, keep-
ing a grocery and general store which he continued about twenty years,
when he embarke in the hardware business.  Two years later he sold out
and retired to the quiet of the farm. He was married  in 1862, to Sophia
Kuebler, born in 1844. This union was blessed  with five children, three
of
whom are living: Albert J., Edward B. and Theodore. They also have an
adopted child, Lydia Ostertag, He and wife are members of the Catholic
church. In the dark days of the rebellion he answered his country's call
and volunteered in Company B, Second Wisconsin volunteer infantry, under
Capt. G. Bouck, and served three years, receiving an honorable discharge
in 1864 at Washington. He was wounded at the battle of Bull Run and at
Gainesville, and at Gettysburg, on account of which he now draws a 
pension. He served as alderman for the Third ward in Oshkosh, two years.
His farm includes eighty-three acres of well improved land.
  EDWARD PERRY, an old pioneer and prominent citizen of Algoma
town, is a native of New York state, born in 1820, son of Curtis and Nancy
(Davis) Perry. The father is of English and the mother of Welsh descent
Edward grew to manhood in his native state, and at twenty-four
years of age emigrated west and settled in Wisconsin.  May 26, 1846, he laid
claim to the farm where he nowl lives. In 1860 he wwas united in marriage
with Ann Janet Titus, born in 1840, and they had trhree children: Charles
C.
Eddie A. and Nancy Mary. Mrs. Perry died in 1874. He served on the 
school board of his town about thirteen years.  His beautiful farm includes
160 acres of land with subtantial buildings.  He also owns in Kansas two
quarter sectins. 
   JOHN P. ROE, formerly a minister, and now a successful fruit grower
in Algoma, is a native of New York State, born in 1834, son of Peter and
Susan E, Roe, both of English descent.  Afer studying in preparatory
schools, he entered Williams College, from which he graduated.  He then
entered the ministry of the Presbyterian church, and soon afterward came
west and settled in Wiscosin, where he continued the ministry and had
charge of the First Congregational church in Oshkosh for three years. 
His health having failed him, he was compelled to give up his ministerial
work, and he then bought and settled on the farm where he now lives.
he was actively engaged in the ministry for six years, and occasionally is
called upon in the case of funerals, and to occupy a vacant pulpit or to
perform the marriage cerenmony.  During the rebellion he served two years
as chaplain of the Ninety-seventh regiment, New York volunteers.  In 1864
he was married to Mary Bliss of Troy, N.Y., whom was born in 1844.  This
union was blessed with seven children, five of whom are now living: Julia
N.,
James W., Mary E., Carrie F., and Charles A.  He now devotes his time 
to gardening and fruit growing, and has the largest vineyard in the state.
He owns forty-four acres of fine land in Algoma town, and six acres


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