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Wisconsin and its opportunities : illustrated by photographs taken in northern Wisconsin
([1905?])

Soils,   pp. [18]-19 PDF (480.8 KB)


Page [18]


SOI LS
T     HE character of the different
       districts of Northern Wiscon-
T      sin varies considerably, and a
       man should be sure to obtain
honest advice when planning his trip
of inspection. The following describes,
in general, the territory adjacent to
the Ashland Division of the Wisconsin
Central Ry., this being the district
where lands can still be had at rea-
sonably low prices, and where settle-
ment is progressing rapidly. There is
no prairie land, practically this entire
area being originally covered with
hardwood, with some pine. All parts
of it are adapted to general farming.
There are no sandy jack pine districts,
such as are found both to the east and
west.      I
  Near Ashland on Lake Superior the
surface is level and the soil a heavy
red clay. A number of years ago fires
went over the lands in this vicinity.
Thcy have thus been cleared of much
timber, and the territory is especially
adapted to stock and sheep raising on
a large scale. The growth of clovers
and grasses on these clay soils is phe-
nomenal. In addition to the clovers
and grasses very large crops of peas
are produced, equalling the yields in
the famous Manitowoc district. Par-
ties settling in this vicinity should
plan to purchase at least 80 or 160
III
acres, and contemplate going into
stock raising.
  Twelve miles south of Ashland ad-
jacent to the Marengo river there is a
small belt of land where the top soil
is a sandy loam and subsoil clay. This
soil is naturally adapted to potatoes,
apples, strawberries, raspberries and
blackberries.
  From Hfghbridge south as far as
Fifield the soil is a good clay loam.
There is some stone to be found in
portions of this district, but it is of a
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