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Wisconsin and its opportunities : illustrated by photographs taken in northern Wisconsin
([1905?])

Crops,   pp. [14]-17 PDF (959.4 KB)


Page [14]


C R O PS
              TIMOTHY.
 T     O  one visiting Northern Wis-
        consin can help but notice the
 T     amazing growth of timothy
        found throughout this region
along highways and logging roads and
in the "cut and burnt-over" districts.
As soon as the timber is removed and
the sun is given an opportunity to
shine on the ground, timothy seems
to take possession and grows to a re-
markable height and density.  The
seeds of this grass were undoubtedly
first brought to the country by lumber-
men in transporting their hay to the
camps, but it is surprising to notice
how much it must have seeded itself
to be found so extensively throughout
this region on unimproved lands.
       RED AND ALSIKE CLOVER.
  Even more remarkable than the
growth of timothy is the natural
growth and spread of red and alsike
clover throughout this region. Like
timothy, the seeds were probably first
brought into the country by lumber-
men, but it has spread itself through
old cuttings and along roadways so
that the proof of the claim that it does
rot freeze out is self-evident to one
taking a trip through this district.
   WHITE CLOVER AND BLUE GRASS.
   Wherever sheep or cattle graze,
white clover and blue grass spring up
an d cover the ground with a dense
mat. The grass is the regular Kentucky
blue grass, or what is sometimes called
"June Grass" in some parts of the
country. Every practical farmer will
recogrize that a country which will
grow Kentucky blue grass, timothy,
red, alsike and white clover as natu-
rally as this does, is a region which
cannot help but take the lead in dairy-
ing and the raising of sheep.
  MR. GEO. M'RERROW ON 'CLOVER."
  In this connection the following
statement by George McKerrow, the
well-known sheep breeder and super
iLtendent of the Wisconsin Farmers'
Irstitute, is of interest: "The clovers
are really the most important plants
TIMOTHY


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