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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XIV ([covers January 1935/December 1935])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XIV, no. 8,   pp. [29]-32 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page [29]


k..  I  I .
WIS.,.it  ;:.
WISCONSIN
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Buireasii nf Agricultural Economics
l. S. KIMBATL. Assisttn,
WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE & MARKETS
Division of Agricultural Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
WALTER H. EBLING, Agricultural Statistician
t Agricultural Statistician     W. D. BORMUTH, Junior Statistician
Vol. XIV, No. 8                       State Capitol, Madison, Wisconain 
                          August. 1935
ARKET) improvement occurred in                                          
  proved condition in the state's live-
lithe WVisconsin corn crop during the                                   
   S   kadkp         pteml        lwi
past month. July was warmi, the ter            IN  THIS ISSUE           
     remarkable   manner. With   continued
perature averaging much above nor-                                      
     proainsduin eharl Augupstur itasno seems
mal. and humidity was high during                                       
     prbab e  tha tthe bpsasmtur e season wilt
most of the month. There were few         August Crop Report            
     be th   best in many years. and the
bu   t steayheatmeyrohuight teperatures    Corn shows marked Improvement
           Weather Summary, July 1935
up. Rainfall averaged below   normal
for the state though in most counties     August Dairy Production       
                  Temperature  Precipitation
there was no serious shortage of mois-     Fewer cows-more milk this year.
              Degrees Fahrenheit  inchen
ture. Heavy rains were reported in a                                    
                 -  -   -  -
few  areas, and late in July drought      Egg Production                
                                     A
conditions prevailed in some weatier       More eggs and greater poultry
llecause of the hot, humid weather        Moe gs ndgeaerpulr
conditlonls were favorable for the de-       profits.                   
        Station E         - _
velopment of rust in grain, and the late                                
                 E.
seeded grain particularly was affected    Lamb and Wool Production      
              E ,          E         OS E  E O
by it. The eally , sowvn grainl, espl(eIilly  Lamb crop larger and more wool
         E                        '-9
that on high ground, which was har-          produced.
vested fairly early, was not so seriously                               
                - __ _
affected by rust, but on low" ground      Prices of Farm Products  
          Duluth -----46 88 68.1 64.0 4.96 376 +0 .39s
where the planting was late baus Pe of                                  
     Escanaba -  52 88 66.0 70.4 4.43 3.33 3   3T
wet weather in the spring, grain was       Slight downward trend reported.
often lodge(d and the rust damage was                                   
     Minneapolis  098 79.8 72.3 2.59 3.73  0.26
extensive. The late fields of grain were                 .              
     La Crosse----59 100 77.9 72 8 3.24 3.90 + .57
also shortened by hot weitlwt and will                                  
     GreenBay-  57 94 75.4 70.0 1.70 3.46 --55i
probably bring down the average yield  low average but good yields are gen-
on grain crops, on which the earlier   cral on the acreage which is available.
 Dubuque-  61 98 79.2 74.1 3.82 3.94 -0.49
seedings were generally good.          Much of the hay was damaged      
by   Madison    60 94 76.3 72.1 2.49 3.88  2 51
Feed supplies are generally large.   weathering due to the rains and some
  Mil..uhee _1 97 75.6 70.1 3.59 2.83 tO 70
The hay crop is estimated at 4,756,000  poor curing weather.            
     production of milk for this summer
tons, the largest crop since 1930. The   Pastures have been far above av-
    will be above the average of recent
production of alfalfa is particularly  erage, being retported as 92 percent
of  years
heavy with good yields and a record    normal at the beginniing of August,
              Cash Crops Vary
acreage. The yields for all tame hay   compared with 48 percent a year ago
are the highest on record because of   and a 10-year average of 74. This
       The potato crop prospects in Wj'iseon-
the large alfalfa acreage included. The  marked improvement in pastures has
  sin declined (luring July. l'anting ons
acreage of tame hay is still much be-  helped to bring about the greatly
im-  many   farms   was delayed   by   wet
CROP SUMMARY OF WISCONSIN FOR AUGUST 1, 1935
Crop
Corn        -
Potatoes -
Tobacco   -      -
O ats  --- - - - - -
Barley ------
Rye ---
Winter wheat
Spring wheat
Clover and timothy
Alfalfa -    - - ---
Other tame hay
All tame hay-.
Wild hay ---
Dry peas -
Dry beans   -
Flax  - --   --
Canning peas  --
Sugar beets
Apples   .--
Cherries
Pasture - -------
1935
(Preliminary)
2 ,25,000
253,000
12 ,000
2 ,514 ,000
926 ,000
290 ,000
21 000
112,000
1 ,423,000
798.000
416 .000
2 .642 ,000
303 ,000
11 ,000
5 ,000
6 ,000
129 .800
17 .400
Acreage
1934
2,384,000
261 000
8, 500
2,334,000
741 .000
221 .000
18 ,000
90 ,000
I 242 ,000
525,000
683 000
2,450,000
357 ,000
20,000
6,000
5 ,000
112,000
19. 103
Percent in-
crease(+) or
decrease (-)
of 1935 acreage
compared with
1934 acreage
5.0
3 .1
+41 .2
+ 9.0
+25.0
+31 .2
+16 .7
+21 .4
+15.0
+52 .0
-39 .1
+ 7 .
--15.1
-45.0
-16 .7
+20.0
+15.9
8.9
- - -   - - - - -
- - - - -   -
August 1,
1935 forecast
70,215 030
23,782 000
15.864.000
91 ,534 ,000
2 ,706,000
3,770,000
420,000
2.016 ,000
2 .245 000
1 995,.000
476 ,000
4,756.000
379 .000
36.700
63.000
2,32 ,030
5 010
Production
1934
73,904,000
31 320,000
11 798.000
65.352,000
19.266,000
1,768.000
207 .000
1 440,000
857 .000
788,000
777 000
2,422 000
321,000
38 .300
55.000
142084000
4 .400
S-year
average
1928-32
69 .375,000
23,38S,000
46 825,000
85,527,000
22.178,000
2.334,000
600,000
1 .219,000
3,634,000
729 .000
224 ,000
4 587 000
274 000
i6,700
82,000
144,800,000
1 .801 ,000
6 ,533
1935 as a
percent of
1934    S-year
average
101.2
101.7
33.9
107 .1
129 .4
161.5
70.0
158.9
62.9
Z73.7
212 .5
103.7
138.3
78.6
76.8
130__.8
76.6
95.0
75.9
134.5
140.1
149.0
213.2
202 .9
140.0
288.6
258,2
61 .3
196.4
118.1
9  5 . 8
114.5
114 .5
- -j - - -
Unit
BuS.
Bus.
Lbs.
Bus.
Bus.
BUS.
Bus.
Bus.
Tons
Tons
Tons
Tons
Tans
BuS.
Bus.
Bus.
Lbs.
Tons
BuS.
Tons
. .I-n101  nugus I
1935
79
80
84
86
85
80
96
98
97
89
85
78
86
78
63
92
1934
85
76
79
61
64
64
58
_38
S1
_77
72
77
43
55
48
IO-yr.
average
1923-32
81
82
83
84
87
84
831
84
79
82
83
85
62-
727
74
'1924-31 av.         2Short-time avcrage.
5) y
l
-             Sr
e',ce.t of n.,m.1)
Production
1934


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