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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XIV ([covers January 1935/December 1935])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XIV, no. 5,   pp. [17]-20 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page [17]


STATE DOUUMrL 1
WIS. LEG. REF. LIBRAR)
WISCONSIN
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Federal-State Crop Reporting .
WALTER H. EBLING, Agricultural
E. S. 1;M111AI.L, Assistant Agricultural Statistician
WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE & MARKETS
Division of Agricultural Statistics
service
Statlstician
W. D. BOllMUTII. Junior Statistician
(1I.   XI V.     \'f.    5
State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsil
CROP CONDITIONS in Wisconsin con-
tinue to be much better than they
were a year ago. While rainfall dur-
ing April was under normal, the
weather was cool and hay and pas-
tures developed rather well In most
counties. Since last September rain-
fall has averaged above normal and
moisture has also been abundant since
May 1. There was an unusually heavy
snowfall, covering most of the state
but particularly heavy in the southern
part during the first days of May.
Weather summaries for the more im-
portant stations commonly used with
Wisconsin crop reports are shown in
the following table:
Wisconsin Weather Summary, April 1935
Temp2rntar
Degrees Fahre
E
16
21
126
24
22
20
I
65
60
76
78
78
78
80
69
35.7
37.4
44 .0
46.0
41 .4
47.0
43.4
41 .5
re       Preipitation
.nheit     inches
Ez       Z
37. 0 1 45 2 .06 + 0.93
37.9 1.11 2.23   201
46.4 2.32 223 + 0 14
472 2,40 2 42 + 093
43.2 1,70 2.65    2.67
48.6 1.57 2.85- 0 54
45.4 1 82 2 77 -1 54
43.  3 0 2 .67 +   I .06
li port s on the coniditioni of winter
- ibis shtow> that they are growing
i11 and that they have coolm through
thei W intei with a milnimum of injury.
Wisconsin reports this month indicated
that winter wheat was 91 percent of
normal, compared wvith 67 a year ago.
and a 10-year average of 84 percent.
The rye condition is 92 percent of nor-
inal, as compared with 71 percent a
year ago, and an average of 86 per-
(-ent. Similarly, hay and pasture con-
ditions are above last year and pas-
ture prospects art, also above the 10-
year average for the state, though the
Improvement in these is less than in
the  a inter grains. For the United
States winter grains, hay, and pasture,
are also better than last year, though
he14, condition for the country as a
whole remains much below the 10-year
iverage. While crop conditions in gen-
e ral are better than last year they are
\ery poor in the Southwestern Great
Ilains area where extreme drought
till prevails. These data are shown
in the following table:
IN THIS ISSUE
Crop Report for May
Maple Sugar and Sirup
Dairy Report for May
Egg Production
Cattle on Feed
Prices on Farn Products
Condition of Winter Wheat, Rye, Hay
and Panture
May 1, 193519.34-10-year average
I Per(eat of Normal)
Wisconsin     United States
10-yr.         10-yr.
nver-         awver-
age            age
192:-          1f142S-
Cr~o  :12  11934 1935 3:2  1934 1935
AV li mer
ik lh e: t _8 4
It R   e  - --
Tia In e
hay - _8.3
tlure _ 761
(Cropu
\ Iater wheait __
It . e   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
(17  91   8;1.2  70.9 75:1.
71    92  84.4   67.8 82.0
61    S1  83.1   69.19 75.4
55    81  719.4  6(6.2 (19.5
Indicated Production of
Wisconasliu aumd
11n:5, 1194. n and
(&in thousmiandi
_   Wimeon
5-yr.
average
1928-32
- 2,:34
I1143-I
210
1,7(18
J rltductioti of winter wheat in Wis-
consin this year is estimated lat 65,1,00o
blushels frotii a probable acreage of
31I0(0  based  on  the  conditions  on
Mtay 1. The yield based on present
condition was estimated at 21 bushels
per acre, -which if it materializes, will
be the highest since 1929. The fore-
iast of rye producton for the state is
now 3,625,000 bushels, which if it ma-
Mutple Sugntr atid Sirup Pro
1934 at
Stttte
Maine  ---   -------- - -----
Newv  Ilaml pshire  ----------
Vermaonit - __ __  ______---
Maxisachmsetts  -----------
New    York  ---------------
Pennsylvania  ------------
M ichigan  ----------------
W imeonsin  ---------------
Mllarylalnd -----------…---
United   Stttes  ------------
Tree#t Tap
1,000 Tre
11.34     1
241       :
.30       c
5,449     5.6
236
3,21(6    3,:
(157      4
1,21(     1,:
436 4
251
57
12,1r5    1 ,I
terializes, will be the largest rye crop
in Wisconsin since 1924. For the United
States winter wheat production is now
placedl at  m al y  4: 11637, 0010 bushels,
which is above last year but still far
below average production. Rye pro-
duction for the United States is esti-
mated at something over 40.000,000
bushels, which is thc largest rye crop
since 1932. These production estimates
ri Show\n iii the aI"I'n ilatiying table:
31aple Sirup andl Sugar Production
The production of maple sugar and
sirup in Wisconsin this year is sub-
stantially larger than it has been for
several years. There were more trees
tapped in the state than have been re-
ported for sev eral years, aiid the yield
per tree has been somiwbat higher.
It is (estimated that there were pro-
diiced  in Wiseonsiii this year 82,000
galloiis of ml1Pe sirup aid 6,000 pounds
of niliple sugar. The qlijiality of the
Wisconsin crop this year is reported to
be excellent and prices are better than
a year ago. Prices for sirup in Wis-
consin this year are repomted at an av-
erage of $1.80 compared with $1.75 last
year. Maple sugar prices are reported
this year at an average of 36 cents
conipared with 28 cents last year. For
the Utiited States the production   of
maple sirup is estimated at 3,340,000
gallons, which Is nearly a million gal-
lons above last year. Maiple sugar pro-
doictioii likewise shows a sublstantial in-
hilter Wheat andl il-e
United States
6-vear a ersigeI
4 Of bus1sels4 )
sinl              tUnited State.%
5-yr.
Indicated  average            Indlented
l93r5   192t32      1934      19u15
15 1   O18,18(   405.034    431, 37
3, 425   :itoss-,  1O0,40    40,356
CealSe. It is (estillateid at 1,714,000
Ipiinlds, whiclh is an incrase oif nearly
half a million pounds ove r last year.
Nearly ill states showed a larger pro-
dictin i f siiup this year, and iti the
Eastern states more sugar was also re-
plirted(l. In the wvesterii maple states
less SugIa  wa :s iimade this y(ar than
list. The data l1iv states an, shown in
the following table:
(ection Estlnates4 by States
nd 1935
ped       Sugar Made         Slrup Made
es       1,1Otl Poundsl     1.000 (allllons
935      19:34    19:15    19:4     1935
,63       15       1#        29       47
1199      59       94        71      103
112      fl78     883       971     1,408
236      105      132        65       fl9
145      2S4      4415     (1(1S     987
If"       83       166      191)     10(1
216        r,      15       27:1     3414
1123      1:t      20        72       98
181"      11         1       30       82
57       1S        1 5      17      1f
04i4    1,271    1.714    2,:39.5   3,3440
May. 1935
Station
Duluth -
Escanaba
Minneapolis
La Cronse-
Green Bay
Dubuque -
Madin--
Miloaukee
l
E


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