University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The State of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XIV ([covers January 1935/December 1935])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XIV, no. 3,   pp. [9]-12 PDF (2.1 MB)


Page [9]


0:1 PtI 1, 1 klJ i tj jym  ll I
WIS. LEG. RE.K LIBRARY
WISCONSIN
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
tTWYsnM 5wA D I'A'11S TIMPAZ3TMIMNT OF AGRICULTURE
WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE & MARKET'
Bureau of Agricultural Economics                              Division of
Agricultural Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
WALTER H. EBLING, Agricultural Statistician
E. S. KIM13ALL, Assistant Agricultural Statistician  W. D. BOllMUTl1. Junior
Statistician
Vol. XIV. No. 3                     State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin   
                    March, 1935
E XTENSIVE Irecovery ill cr0op laereages
Efrom     the  widespread   destruction
which  occurred  is a result of the
diought during tue past few years is ill
prospect th~s year for Wiscolnsilj and
for the country as a whole. The inten-
iojis to plant inft.orilt ti on fu rnisihed by
Wisconsin reptorters shows that they
plan ain ixpansioli of their total crop
acleCage jioc litere jl)ir'tieullrl'y ijiretses
in hiy alicd ijj the grain grIouls which
we-le ll.territrialvt r*(ieduce  ly drough~lt
duriig recent years.
Hny utnd GrafnM Inerelae
Talnie hay hats lolig been Wisconsin's
leading crop. During the drought years
silice 1929 the state lost about a mllillion
IInd thr'--quarters tcres of clover and
timothy hay, largely because of the
drying Olit of new siedings atld partly
through winterkilling of seedings and
old jialliows. This loss of clover and
tiniothy was iji part offset by increasi's
in alfalfa and in other ta(ne hay. but
eveji so the net loss iji Wisconsin's
tarne hilty dturdijg the 5-year period has
been close to one million acres.
Somlie recovery from the low point in
tilmi nay acreage reached in the' state
iji 1!1:14 is iludicated for this year. the
probable increease above last year be-
ing ahliut ,I aluar'ter of a million acres.
Ev'eni withi this increase the hay alcrte-
atg(i of the state will be 20 percent be-
low axerage.
Widl.Sple:sprad  dec(reases  iji lettding
tllrops such as hay influence the acre-
ages of other crops. Last year the
stat 1's corn acreage made a new high
record and this yelar the corn crop is
expected to decline somewhat.
Grtait crolps which were in part re-
ducedl ly drought last year are ex-
peeted to slhow  sharp increases this
yi'ar. Thi' oats LUervage in th.' state
is expel'ted to ijicrolllse 9 petein t, andl
if the plainting intentions ('xpl'iessed by
reporters j'l,' carried out, it will re'ach
this year aI level of 2,544,000   llcrse,
w, hich is slightly above the state's 5-
yealr average.
A New High for llarley
Reports from  farmers indili't' theeir
lltt iojis to illerlasi the acirage (..f
barley in Wisconisin by 18 percritt this
year. wthic h, if carried ott, will britig
the state's acreage of this crop to 874,-
0110 which is 58,000 acres mor.' than the
previous high record In the state minde
IN THIS ISSUE
1935 Planting Intentions
March Dairy Report
Egg Production
The Spring Lamb Crop
Prices of Farm Products
ill 199. \Vith so large all atreiage tild
giotd yields the barley crllp of 1935 may
Nvell be at ntw record for tihe state. ialIr-
ly has tideliolistrat id its value its a
t;id  crlop  diii  Ii the  itrought, y  ittts. all.]
last yelir it was also profitable aIS 1t
cash crop.
't'he  halley  ptalit ing  intenilitis  fti
tile Ulnited Stlates atlso show aln ilicrilus,
hilch, if' carried out, Will bFijig the 1t-
tion's aeririge of this crop eos, to 12,-
1tt0il011. This will be approximaltely the
avirage baltrity atcleage for the Un it'd
Stat-s for recelit years.
'TIhe Sprilig whealt acreage ti Wisetill-
Sill iS expected to b' increased abo1iut
Iii p.rcenlt, atlid the inclease fir tihe
,ol'111try\ aIs il whllle is s;olcw~vl~lt 1:11,ger,1
Evii with this incerlise the airealge if
spring wheat will probably be consider-
ably belox aver Iage.  With dr y w oiither
eonditions still prevailing  in soilne lf
th+- im"so'tanlt spingl'l'l    I''l   O1
siderltble uncertainty prevails ns to thie
priospects ftr this crop.
('hanges   ill the  itlcragis tif t'ash
crlops for Wisconsin protbably xvill not
be very great this year. A Sillill ill-
crease is expected ill potatoes, aind in-
creases are also likely it. Iflx. tob.leeco
;,,( Ollimils. ri,(swe ,,., 1)nier crop)s iirit
-itowli ill the alc(iompalnlyl3ilIg title.
Crop C'ond1ititoant More- F'storathile
After ,i series of dlrouglt ytars Ili-
gillillri  inl  1930(  vil)ul  cot!.;,:Ll,  s i,.
hist SetptemlSer have beeen motec f. vol-
able. In Wisconsin    moistilre risirves
in  thi'  soil  havi  iee i  ti tatriaully  ill-
creased during the past fall antd xxill-
ter, and wvith at heavy snow cover over
jloust of the state the soil moistule sit-
IlatlOli i.s probably more satisfactory
than it hats been at any time in live or
six years. There has been little frost
ill the ground and water from melting
sInows is being Iquite generally absorbed
without much sur face rull-off.
So far winter grains and tile seedings
of clover and gra';LSS seem to have come
through in a satisfactory manlier. aid
little apprehe Ision has be en express d
regaldinig  them  in this stat..  Even
\ III ii fa voradle winter and spring the
hay acreage In the state or fol the
* otiotry as a whole will probably not
It ill((se;Id mucls h beyonid pl res(lit cX-
lilt atioi becaluse  of the  widespread
lo>ss of seedings in thl  drought of last
slimame. It will take aniother yeal of
fi.voi aitl(. weather to bring the si ed-
ilngs of 1935 into production before th(e
lhay orealge tan tie rs.tored to lliilllli
levels.
e' p(Ol'l'( Spol(l( nts Le(por tvd ain av-
iraige of 1:1.65 milk cows per farmi for
IMarch 1 for WiseOlsini, a figure be-
txwieen 7 and 8 percent below th(- nun.111-
bers reported of one year tigo. Due t.
favorable weather conditions, a ris, 'I
0.5 p       o llt occurred in milk production
p, r cow in herd and this together with
til 1owet tininie brl'S of c(NNiS pr farim  ri -
sulteid ill !i ll~t Ileeliti. of 7 perlcelt in
the levxl . of miilk plroductioni till retlort-
ts' farllims c.tt iri t.1 to tile lPrevious
yallr, alld it shows II recessioll of 17
plerienit lheloNN the eight-year aiverage
1925 t,, 1932 for March 1 prlodletion.
The   ac com.nlinyin g l talble  gives  milk
pr odtic tion dit a as reported by crop
el0ri-esipondonlts.
ill spit. of aI miire favorahle tnilk-
feed pliel rat tio for Febtruary there wals
onlV ly i 6 pletelit increaisi' in grain and
coljiciltnites fedl lIl cow ill herd above
tihe ti'iitcillom lilelitli  tomltle to the
(0(1:l serlsoliill ilicrleisei of 7 percent for
tIl 5UtilI leilioll 'l'lie figulr(e fir M~arch
I Nwj is I pireit I)low   the figtire on
glrill fed tier cow in herd of March 1
it year ago.
A slliei) His  in nujalirls of cale:.
iw'ilig l:triaSt'd aihov\ :1 y('.( earlier evi-
ditlitly itfli.':ilt s thlt ftijmers are an-
ticipaltilg a nilled fol molre cows in the
ftlrin, l to buiild illp their sotnewihat d( -
pl itdd herds.
PLANTING PlANS FOR 1935
WISCONSIN
Acreage (000 omitted)
Crops
Harvested
Last Year
(1934)
Corn-   -        - - -
Oats _
Barley      - --
Spring wheat - -----
Flas       - -_
Potatoes -I
Tobacco -            _
Dry beans --    -------
Soy beans (grown alone)
Tame hay    .
Cabbage-
Onions-
2 384
2 334
741
90
S
261
7.5
6
157
2.450
23
5-Yr. Av.
1927-31
2 006
2.449
696
66
250
38
12
3.353
18.41
1.041
Indicated
for
Harvest
1935
2 ,265
2 544
874
99
6
251
8
S
110
2,69S
22.5
1.1
Intentions 1935 as per-
cent of
5-Yr.
Average
1934       1927-31
95        112.9
109        103.9
118        125.6
110        150.0
120         75.0
96        100.4
107         21.1
83         71.4
70        916.7
110         80.4
98        122.31
110        185.81
Acreage (000 omitted)
Harvested
Last Year      5-Yr.
Average
(1934)      1927 -31
07,486      100,706
30,395       39 .673
7,144       11.963
9 290       20.338
974        2,915
3,303        3,201
1 .335       l ,904
1.378        1,769
4,107       2,5/6
51,495       54,420
175          1431
83          841
Indicated
for
Harvest
1935
95,692
39 ,108
11 954
17 .847
1 .845
3 .272
1 511
1 .909
4 .997
53.117
140
94
Intentions 1935 a. per-
cent of
1934
1934
109 .4
128.7
167.3
192.1
189 .4
99 .1
113.2
138.5
121.7
103.1
80.0
113.3
5-Yr.
S-Yr.
Average
1927-31
95.0
98.6
99 .9
87 .8
63.3
102.2
79.4
107.9
199 .4
97.6
97 .91
101 .21
15-year average, 1929-1933.
-
I
---T~   -.1-E
I


Go up to Top of Page