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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XIII ([covers January 1934/December 1934])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XIII, no. 5,   pp. [17]-20 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page [17]


%iI, aS . i;:-.'i  It .,V
WISCONSIN
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bur.au of Agrimiltnrnl Economics
WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE & MARKETS
Division of Agricultural Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
WALTER H. EBLING, Agricultural Statistician
S. J. GILBERT, Assistant Agricultural Statistician                      
  G. T. GUSTAFSON, Junior Statlstician
Vol. Xlll, No. 5                   State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin    
                         May, 1934
b. er ofA trees. t;l~e  tnw ye:ar, the- pit'-
UNUSUAL drought has prevailed in
Wisconsin during the p r e s e n L
spring. Rainfall has been below nor-
mal at all of the important weather
stations in the State for the first four
months of the year. in spite of recent
beneficial rains certain items in Wis-
consin's crop picture are off to a very
poor start.  The condition of pasture
at the beginiing of the present month
is reported at only 55 percent of nor-
mttl which is the lowest on record for
the state.  Tame hay which is Wis-
consin's leading crop similarly has ex-
ceedingly low condition, the average at
the beginning of the ntonth being re-
ported at 61 per cent of normal comn-
pared with the ten-ycar average of 85.
This is the lowest May condition figure
for tame hay for any year for which
tecords are available.
While no condition figures are taketi
for Alay on the spring-sown grains,
these are generally reported to be im
fairly good condition.  Experience has
showvit that a relatively dry seed bed
ordinarily is favorable to spritg-sowa
grltins because of the generally good
coliditiotn of th- soil wheit it is worked
op in dry w-eather. Wisconsin's spring-
sown grains this ye-ar were planited un-
der favorable cotiditiotls, and similarly
the corn grotnid  ,vis largely pitintetl
under relatively favorable weather ctt-
ditions so that the outlook for these
crops with recenit rains canl be defi-
nitely termed as being favorable.
Winter griains sucth (1S rye and wittter
wheat are in poor condition.  Wiscoit-
sin's xvinter wheat acreage is at a rel-
atively loxv level, it be~ng estimated
that there are only 27,0t,0 acres left
for harvest out of the 35,000 atcr es
plaited last fall. The condition of will-
ter wheat is reported as onl) 67 per
cent of ilormal which is the lowest
since 1918.  The estimated prodittioti
of xvinter wheat for Wiscotisin this
year is 378,000 bushels which is the
lowest winter wheat production on rec-
ordl. It arises ill part, out of the poor
(condition of the cr1op antd in part oiut
of the very small acreage oin the state s
farms. llye likewise is inr poor colldi-
tioti, it being reported as only 71 peir
cetit of normal compared wvith 87 per
ceiit for the ten-year average     Thi'
estimlitld acrelage to Ile harvested for
gratin is 273,000 and thi forecast of
ploduction for   Visconsin is 3t3t3,0ttl
w hib cotmpares   vith 2,260,0001 bushels
til last year whitn the plrodiot n wlltt (s
atl aI low point. The acreage to be halt-
vestetd this year Nvill be about 21 per
(ltint larger than  that harvested last
tUnited Suites Crop11
'T1h  (rop  sititationt ill the Ulnited
Statlls cotitinues highly abtiormal and
cropi p rolspects are very un(certain be-
(aitse( of inla(eqluate raitifall and 1t gen-
e1a11 lack of subsoil mo.stulre ill the
Nolrth C'etitral and Westetn (lCrotis (If
states which ordinarily have two-titi ids
of thi totial crop aiceiage. lII the ('0i-
tl'V ais a whole wiitter glitilns do IlOt
show nulmsua~l aIbandlonmlienrt, lint y i4lds,
per acre seeta likely to the niiot far atbov
the lowest yield per a(crl' of recerit
years.  Hay cloPs ;111(1 (l LIStisns hay)V
haila  1 po(o  stti1st ittid their clonlitiot
on May 1 is retlelrtedl by cr11) corne-
stltttdl;ts \\ :I s  stlitstaltti(lly  IOwXIr
IN THIS ISSUE
May Crop Report
Maple Sugar and Syrup
Production
May Dairy Report
Egg Production
Prices of Farm Products
than on the same date in any of the
past 50 years.  The shortage of pas-
ture is particularly serious in arets
that were severely affected by drought
last season and which aire now suffer-
ing from an acute scarcity of feed for
all livestock.
The 1934 whiiter wheat cr1O) is fore-
cast at 461,471 000 bushels is comppared
with the 1933 cr1 1) of 351,030000 bushels
and the five-ye, r, average production
of 632,061,000 bushels. Rye product Ioil
is forecast at 27, 9i6,000 bushels as dOm -
pared with 21,184,000 bushels prlodIlued
in 1933 and the five-yeotr average plro-
ductioli of 401,9500110 btishels.
Weather Summary, April 1934
Temperature
)eerees Fahrenhait
Stat ionl
Duluth _-    .
Escanaba   -
Minneapolis .-
La Crssse
Green Bay
Dubuque . -.
Madisons
Milwaukee
E
21
92
19
18
27
25
27
29
30
31
I?
85
63
91
85
76
81
76
80
37 .4
36 .
46.A
47.
4Z21
45.1
45 .:
45.f
Precipitation
Inehes
-c
I1.
3 .
I1.
36 2.06
01 2.23
57 2.23
0 .90 2 AZ
I 9l12.65
1 .03 2 .85
1 .08 277
1.53 2.68
* C-
IS I
I=a
a -
1 .83
-0.47
-- 2 .36
-Z.40
2.15
3.05
4.10
3.66
2
Z
37.0
37.9
46.4
47.2
43.2
48.6
45 .4
43.
38a.ible  S sugair nsi  Siru.p 1Productloi
The   production    of   )alple sttgar and)11
sirtip ill XVisconsin this splring showvs a
t're1t'St' from   the relaltively large crop
of (1 y5t)ar LtgO.   Accordillg tO    XVisct)o -
sin  motple   silmuP  and sugar plrodliltlers,
il  total  elf  251,4I1I10  i(111211   tl lcs  XXIw r
taplpl)td this stlrillg  (compillrdllt  w illh til'
high   point of 295,I0l tlie's      tiltpitw  ill
191..3 atnd  2S1,I00i  iil 19132  I) atdlItioli
to tif (1 d, cralsc ill the( 111li1lher oIf trct fs
tttPilte this year irl til staiti, the flo\\
If  tiatile  sal) has     Iteel  conllsidelrlly5
uders normal, it heding (Bstinl21td      tha2t
30,l000  glllotlls   lt  siltup)  aid    11,4000
ulotttitds  (ef  m atdtle'  stiga1 1  WR ll ( l)liltu etl
this  splring.    While   there   Xw'(ts it dle-
*iraIst5I (If ((bout 15 per eeit in thXt (ill-
ber of trees tapped this Vear, III- pro-
duetion has been only a little over half
of a year Igo. The quality of maple
products this year is reported to be
good.  The reported average price cf
maple sirup is $1.75 per gallon antd the
average price of stigar is 28 (-nts per
pound.
The United States produetion of ma-
pIe products this year is not greatly
changed from    t year ago, the sirup
production  show ing  all increase  otI
about 10 percent and the sugar pro-
duction a decline of 8.5 percent. The
season for the produict ion( of tnapte
products was mloderately favora ble in
the Eastern Sta tes but qtite unfavora-
ble in the North Central States. While
the season was generally short (illd the
flow  of sap light the effects (If these
adverse factors ill the imiportanlt East-
ern States was largely offset lby tit ut-
usually high sugar (lntentt ill the- salp.
The productiton of the leading statil s
for the past two years, 1933 and 1934,
is givet ll1)110W:
MAPLE SUGAR AND SIRUP PRODUCTION
ESTIMATES
State
Me.
N. H.-
Vt.    _
Mass.
N.Y.
Pa.
Ohio --
Mich.
Wis.
Md.
U.S.--
Trees
Trees
Tapped
1933   1934
1,000 trees
255    260
388    376
5.290 5.343
236    236
3,184 3,216
664    657
1 ,216  1 .216
499    436
295    251
58     57
12,076 12 048
Segar
Made"
1933   1934
1,000 pounds
10       7
46     50
554    597
66     110
388     284
108      83
32       5
35      II
24      I I
25      18
1,288  1 178
Sirtip
Sirup
Made
1933   1934
_ I-ne -^
1,000 gala.
29     30
50     69
(25    994
36     57
597    668
209    199
413    273
140     72
62     30
25     17
2 186 2 409
Miy Dairy Report
Milk production per c(% ill the herds
of Wisconsili crop reporl-trs was re-
ported at 16.09 pounds (,Il 2lay 1. This
is abottt 10 pertelit less thaii (om the
same elate last year. 16 Ipenet(lt less
lowest indication for Ahay 1 il the 10
years for which the record hals beets
kept. The contintted unfat voiable milk-
than the 1925-31 average, and is the
feed  price  relationship,  short  farm
grain suplllies, the diy and late pas-
ture season, and to soliie extent the
greater nunmbter of relatively thi bn and
old cows otl far liis have all cotmbiined
to bring the milk prtlouction pler cow
to the present low levels. While nor-
mally little of the feed for Wisconsiti
daiiy cows is o)bttilnett fromii paisttures
by Slay 1, dtairy repolirters illdiCatC te ilt
a much smaller atmoulit thali usual is
from pstur'-s tIbis rLIi.
,I
I.1
I .7
i:.
j i
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