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The Aeroplane
(1914)

Literary,   pp. 8-18


Page 8

8                       THE     AEROPLANE 
kinds of writing, affords them much help and enjoyment. It also shows their
parents and 
others what they can do. But even then we need some help from outside the
school. 
It creates a school spirit. This fact is undeniable. The school paper keeps
the 
students interested in their own school, it makes them proud of the good
things in it, and 
keeps them trying to find remedies for the bad. 
Certainly, all of the above things are for the good of the school and therefore
for the 
good of the people of the city. It Aeems strange that the business men above
all others 
should unite, not to help, but to down an institution like a school paper.
If they received 
no value at all for the small amount they might put into this paper, it would
be slightly 
different. But they do get full value. Although the circulation of the "Aeroplane"
is only 
about four hundred, there are probably not more than one thousand people
of all 
kinds on the east side of Green Bay who do not read It from cover to cover.
In concluding, let us say that we would like to arrange for a meeting with
the Mer- 
chants' Association at which we could discuss the subject of advertising
in this paper. 
We believe that if they took the attitude of judges, we could persuade them
that such 
advertising would be beneficial to all concerned. 
A 
// 
PEARL'S LOCKET 
When Pearl, the eighteen year old ward of Judge Townsend, left for college,
the 
judge placed in her hand a little gold box, suspended from a very delicate
gold chain, 
with the words, "Here Pearl, is a little token left you by your mother.
When she died, 
she requested this be given to you. You are not to open it except in case
of urgent need." 
Pearl looked at the locket In wonder, and finally clasped it around her neck.
After she settled down to her college studies in earnest she had little time
to think 
of the locket. She was one of the most popular and most beautiful girls at
college. 
A few weeks before Christmas she received a letter from her uncle, telling
her she 
was to spend the week's vacation in New York. She was to take an eastern
train Thurs- 
day and her uncle would meet her at 10 o'clock, at Squaie Junction. 
On Thursday Pearl was at the station, all ready to start on her journey.
She had 
little money; just enough to pay her fare and to buy some fruit that she
wanted. The 
next. morning at 9 o'clock the train drew up in New York. Pearl got off and
went to the 
spacious waiting room to wait for her uncle. 
She sat down and began to look around. After a little while she grew tired
of hay- 


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