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The Aeroplane: commencement
(1912)

Class prophecy,   pp. 34-36


Page 34

T     H     E       A    E    R    0    P    L    A    N     E 
It is the year 1942. The Alumni Association of the East High 
school has just held its annual meeting. For years it has flourished 
and so thrifty is its present financial condition, that it is now possible
to edit a record published in thirty-six volumes, and bound in Mo- 
rocco leather, an ornament to any library. The object is to fur- 
nish a complete record ot the whereabouts and occupations of all its 
members, from the year of the school's organization. Representa- 
tives have been appointed from each class, to gather the necessary 
statistics from among their classmates. 
It has been our privilege to gather the required data for the class 
of 1912, and from all corners of the earth come replies to our ques- 
tionings. However, as many are still in Green Bay, we have first 
compiled the statistics concerning them. Some are connected with 
old East High, about which a few words of explanation may be nec- 
essary at this point. 
The fact that the city has grown so rapidly northward that its 
limits now reach what was Point Comfort, made it necessary to locate 
the school at a more nearly central point. It was ascertained, by a 
committee for that purpose, that what was formerly Bay View Beach 
was about the best location obtainable. The present school cover-3 
an area of four hundred acres, with many outlying experimental 
farms and stations. 
At the head of the experimental farm is Leland Joannes, called 
"The Gentleman Farmer." We know our schoolmates will not be 
surprised at this, as Leland always showed a tendency toward farm- 
ing. 'Tis not a surprise to many that Lewis Donner, who, in good 
old school days, was such a stargazer, is now the professor in the 
astronomical observatory; but who would guess that Bernard Guein- 
zius would be the Professor of Divinity in the Theological school 
now connected with old E. H. S.? 
The Domestic Science course has at last after twenty-five years 
of tedious waiting, become a part of the East High School curricu- 
lum, and Maude Feldhausen, at its head, is an emblem of domestic 
thrift. So busy is she that she finds no time to attend the many 
social functions which crave her presence. Who would have thought 
that thirty years could bring such a change in the state of affairs? 
One of the most successful and useful departments in the school 
course is the nautical and life-saving station. Abe Rosenthal, an 
instructor in this branch, is the beacon who lights many a flounder- 
ing youth from the cruel rocks of failure, to the quiet harbor of 
success. We can all remember that Abe was the shining light in 
his classes when we were schoolkids. 
The Aeroplane factory in connection with the school, is now 
turning out forty machines a day. This division is superintended by 
Max Roseman, who, as you will remember, made our "Aeroplane" a
high-flyer in the old days. 
The school has not only aimed to aid our children mentally and 
physically, but has also established a hospital for sick or stray ani- 
Page Thirty Four 


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