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Wisconsin State Horticultural Society / Annual report of the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society for the year 1910
Volume XL, Part II (1910)

Pearson, C. L.
Your family strawberry bed,   pp. 17-20 PDF (895.7 KB)


Page 17


SUMMER MEETING.
Prof. Moore: We get larger returns from our Pearl bushes
than the Downing.
Mr. Ke'logg: That paper is a very good paper for the be-
ginner. I got one promising idea from it, that of flavoring jams
and jellies with the chinch bug.
YOUR FAMILY STRAWBERRY BED.
C. L. PEARSON, Baraboo.
Growing strawberries is such an easy task that I will not make
it appear difficult by reading a long essay. A family strawberry
bed is easily within the reach of every farmer or any person
who owns or controls a few rods of tillable ground; their cul-
tivation is a pleasure while you are anticipating the possibilities
of an enormous yield of the lucious fruit strictly home grown
and the fun really begins with the ripening of the berries.
Having available ground the next question is in regard to
plants; order of a reliable plant grower and you will be likely
to get varieties which will pollenize and bear fruit.
I have known farmers to order plants of nursery agents at
$2.50 a hundred and when fruiting time came round there were
no berries. The cause of failure being the improper mating of
varieties. Good plants can be bought at $1.00 'a hundred or
less and two hundred plants will supply a large family with
berries besides some big ones to brag about and give to your
friends. A good list of varieties is Warfield, Beder Wood, Dun-
lap, Crescent, Sample and Aroma and there are others.
The ground should be prepared early in the spring as for
other garden crops. About May, 1st is the best time for trans-
planting. A spade or garden trowel can be used in setting the
plants which should be in rows about 31/2 ft. apart and 18 inches
apart in the rows. The soil should be firmly pressed about the
roots.
A family strawberry bed can be cultivated with a hoe and
garden rake but if a horse and cultivator are available so much
the better. If the plants send out too many runners cut off
some of them and the result will be larger plants and better
fruit.
About Nov. 1st cover the plants lightly with straw or some
2-H. S.
17


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