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Wisconsin State Horticultural Society / Annual report of the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society for the year 1910
Volume XL, Part II (1910)

Nourse, Harvey
Big Bayfield berries,   pp. 59-63 PDF (1.1 MB)


Page 59


WINTE  MEKrNG.
cepting a few on orders. We do not get the big prices that I
see they do in Sparta, 'but we have better shipping facilities;
they go by refrigerator cars, and we know what the prices are;
we think we have a pretty good commission man at Minneapo-
li we could not do better than he can do.
Mr. G. J. Kellogg: What is your best black raspberryI
Mr. Morse: We think the Kansas is about the best. We
have the Plum Farmer, that is very good.
Mr. M. S. Kellogg: 'What varieties of blackberries?
Mr. Morse. Mostly Ancient Briton. They are raising a few
Eldorados on account of their earliness, their price is better,
they do not last as long as Ancient Briton.
A Member: Is the Eldorado as productive as the Ancient
Briton?
Mr. Morse: No sir, they are not, but it is a nice big berry.
BIG BAYFIELD BERRIES.
HARvEY NouRsi, Bayfield, Wia.
The subject assigned to me by your Secretary suggests the
style of berries grown at Bayfield, but if size of berry were all,
this in itself would not make berry growing a success, how-
ever, we have the quality and the yield as well.
First, as to big berries, I have seen berries picked from my
strawberry fields measure seven inches in circumference. One
of our growers declares he filled a quart box with eight berries
and quite a number of boxes each with sixteen and twenty
berries. I have known a day's picking of the Senator Dunlap
variety to count about 26 berries to the quart and there are
other varieties much larger than the Senator Dunlap but we
have yet to find in our section a better variety. F. V. Holston
of our city, one of the first men to engage in strawberry grow-
ing, a number of years ago sold to the Stone-Ordean Company
in Duluth two twenty-four quart crates of strawberries at $5.00
per crate under a guarantee that not a berry in the crate should
measure less than five inches in circumference. They wrote Mr.
Holston afterwards that they were very much pleased and the
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