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Wisconsin Dairymen's Association / Tenth annual report of the Wisconsin Dairymen's Association : held at Sheboygan, Wis., January 11-13, 1882. Report of the proceedings, annual address of the president, and interesting essays relating to the dairy interests
(1882)

Hoard, W. D.
The influence dairying has had in Wisconsin, upon the farm, the farmer, and the community at large,   pp. 63-68 PDF (1.2 MB)


Page 63

 
Tur INuFLuxNc DAIRYING RAS HAD IN WISCONSIN.    63 
and withal lend dignity to our own characters. Let us, therefore, 
press our way onward and upward, knowing that there is always 
room a. the top in every calling, not excepting butter making. 
Mr. Hiram Smith -It may not be known to all present that the 
Miss Morley who has just read this paper did Wisconsin the great 
honor of taking the first prize at the International Dairy Fair in a 
class open to the world, made with her own hands, and Wisconsin 
reaps the honor. 
THE INFLUENCE DAIRYING HAS HAD IN WISCONSIN, 
UPON THE FARM, THE FARMER, AND            THE COM- 
MUNITY AT LARGE. 
By W. D. HOARD, President of the Northwestern Dairymen's Association, 
Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. 
Mr. Preident, Ladies and Gentlemen of the Association:- I 
think it is Buckle who says, " That those great modifying princi- 
ples which make up the sum of civilized advancement, all find 
their source in the common people." It is only another form of 
that saying attributed to Horace Greeley, " Nations and trees have 
the same law of growth; the foundations of their progress are be- 
low the surface, out of sight." 
Thinkers generally agree that that progress which contains the 
best and most enduring elements must include in a marked degree 
the simpler as well as the more complex forms of society. 
We are all desirous of seeing Wisconsin prosper, and we know 
that unless the farm and the farmer give exhibition of prosperity, 
there can be no true material salvation for the community at large. 
It follows, then, that we can have no higher purpose or worthier 
ambition than to inspire sound thought, elevate the standard, en- 
brge the profit and ennoble the character of Wisconsin agriculture. 
The peculiar effect dairying has had in this direction will be the 
theme of our thought for a few moments. 
I have been a somewhat enthusiastic observer and student of 
agriculture in Wisconsin for over twenty years. 
LSaving in 1857 the close, compact and more methodical systems 


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