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Reynolds, Annie / The training of teachers for the country schools of Wisconsin
(1917)

Present courses of study,   pp. 4-11 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page 4


4    TRAINING OF TEACHERS FOR THE COUNTRY SCHOOLS
             Im  A    8 OF TEADUNG SLOOLS
  Before considering specifically the work training schools should do,
let us consider the two distinct aims which training schools have in
view-
              1. To Improve Elementary Education
  To bring all possible influences to bear upon the improvement o:
the elementary education furnished country children; to train teach-
ers in using the school time of these children to the best advantage,
so that they may be, as far as possible, prepared for life in its various
phases. This aim depends for its realization on a better understand-
ing of the nature, development, and purpose of the subject matter to
be taught and all that this implies.
    2. To Become Important Factors In Country Life Progress
  To help improve the condition of country people financially, so-
cially, physically, inteliectually and morally. Part of this work may
be done indirectly for the next generation through the children who
are now in school, but training teachers must also work, as oppor-
tunity offers, with, and for, the parents. Naturally, teachers often
prefer to emphasize the work with children to the exclusion of the
work with adults. Nevertheless, "the formidable and unavoidable
judgment of their contemporaries" must be taken into account by
training teachers who should become skilful in cooperating with coun-
try people and in unobstrusively assisting them to bring about needed
results.
             IV. PIGZBLT COUE OF STUDY
                   1. In County Trining Schools
   a. Changes needed in catalogs. An exnm!nat cn of tra nun
school catalogs reveals the fact that their preparation needs more
consideration. Some of them are too brief and too hastily compiled
to reflect credit on the school issuing them. The publication of a
creditable catalog is one of the tangible ways In which a training
school discharges its obligations to the public. The student body of
the school, the alumni, country teachers of that part of the state, and
in fact all people attacking the problem of rural education, are bene-
fited by such a catalog. An additional reason for giving care to the
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