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The oriole year book: Evansville Junior College
(1920)

Commercial seniors


Commercial Seniors 
CLASS OFFICERS. 
President  ......................... V. A. Gillingham 
Vice  President  ....................... M.  Stirdivant 
Secretary and Treasurer ................ Laura Johnson 
Honorary Member ................... Miss Townsend 
As the human race progresses its needs increase, and as needs increase barter
Increases. Therefore trade, or commerce, Is actually a criterion of the intellectual
status of the people. ShoW, me the nation that excels in art, in literature,
in scholarship, and I will show you a people that has a sound commercial
basis. 
Trade is the initial step in civizIation. As man begins to exchange products,
he begins to exchange ideas,, and thought multiplies by contact with thought.
There has been a decided tendency on the part of our so-called devotees of
art that commerce is vulgar, and the pursuit of "low brows." Scarcely
a "rhymester," or a "free verser," or a "cubic artist,"
but his particular muse impels him into a tirade against trade. These "poets"
forget that but for this same dispised commerce, they would have no paper
on which to wreak their fine frenzies, nor royalties to buy sustenance while
they do the wreaking. 
Keen business ability is as truly intellectual in its own domain as are the
researches of scientists, or the compilations of the scholar in his. Therefore
schools can very properly admit business training into their curriculum.
A DREAM. 
I climbed into my hammock to let Sunday afternoon quiet hour pass, and lo,
I dreamed a dream. I was in a great theater. From the boxes I caught the
gleam of many a diamond. The balcony was crowded with an expectant throng.
An intense hush was upon the audience. The curtain rose. All eyes were fastened
on a solitary figure in the center of the stage. He was tall, dark of hair
and eyes, rosy of cheek, and handsome of face and figure. A sort of breathless
sigh passed through the audience, and I felt, rather than saw. that he was
the cynosure of hundreds of admiring feminine eyes. Somewhere in the depth
of my dream-consciousness there lurked an elusive remembrance of the actor.
Somewhere, some place I had seen this man. 


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