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Wisconsin. State Conservation Committee (1915-27) / Biennial report of the State Conservation Commission of Wisconsin for the years 1915 and 1916
(1916)

Proposed gift of Trempealeau Mountain,   pp. 89-91 PDF (621.9 KB)


Page 89


                       . BIENNIAL REPORT                           89
superintendent is hereby authorized and directed to enforce these rules
and regulations and all provisions of the law governing the state parks.
  The Active Cooperation of all campers and cottagers is earnestly
asked in all matters concerning the welfare of the parks for the preserva-
tion of order and proper sanitation."
  The total expenditures on the six parks during the fiscal year 1915-16
were as follows:
       Devil's  Lake  Park ............   .............  $4,028.44
       Peninsula  Park  . . ............................................
.  3,824  .24
       Ihterstate  Park  .  ..........1...................  ...............
.... -  1,776  .65
       M arquette  Park  ...... .. ......... ....... ... .......  1,378 
.72
       Brule  Park  . .  .  .....3............................................
............  342.88
       Cushing Park ..........         .   .   .         295.00
  Value of Buildings on State Parks.
      Devil's Lake  Park ....... ......... ..........  _$20,350.00
      Peninsula  Park  (buildings) .........  .................. 15,634.00
         (towers, 2) ............................ ....... .  1,620.00
       Marquette Park ........                        1,000.00
       Interstate  Park   ............................   ........  400 .00
           Total ....... ..............   ......  $39,000.00
       PROPOSED GIFT OF TREMPEALEAU MOUNTAIN.
  This commission takes great pleasure in announcing that, through the
great generosity and public spirited act of Mr. John A. Latsch of Winona,
Minnesota, Trempealeau Mountain, comprising almost 500 acres, both
scenically and historically one of the most interesting points in the upper
Mississippi, will soon be donated to the state as a public park. Dr. E. D.
Pierce of Trempealeau and other local historians have been endeavoring
to secure this property for the public, and through their efforts Mr.
Latsch became interested and decided to purchase it and donate it to the
county or state. Dr. Pierce and Mr. Latsch at first desired to present
this property to the State Historical Society, but were persuaded by Mr.
M. M. Quaife, Superintendent of the Society to turn it over to the state
as an addition to the State Park System, since the Historical Society is
not organized to administer such a trust.
  Trempealeau Mountain was called by the Winnebagos, "Ilay-nee-ah-
chah" or "Soaking Mountain," and the French voyageurs adopted
the
native term, but in their own language, and the present term is an angli-
cized corruption of the latter part of the French designation, and no one
who has ever voyaged on the upper Mississippi and has seen from the deck
of his boat the lofty crest of the noble peak towering above him as if from
midstream, can question the appropriateness of the name.
  Father Louis Hennepin discovered Trempealeau Mountain in 1680 and
five years later Nicholas Perrot.and party going to build a fur trading
post among the Sioux Indians, was overtaken by bad weather near this
site, and took up their quarters at the foot of the mountain, where they
remained until the spring of 1686. Three years later they planted the


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