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Wisconsin. State Conservation Committee (1915-27) / Biennial report of the State Conservation Commission of Wisconsin for the years 1915 and 1916
(1916)

Survey of trough streams,   pp. 26-30 PDF (1008.0 KB)


Page 26


26      WISCONSIN CONSERVATION COMMISSION
Lake Monona (Sec. 62.38) ...    ..............................................
 165,465
Lake Waubesa (Sec. 62.38) ........................ .........................
 96,985
Lake Kegonsa (Sec. 62.38) .................................................
  210,872
Lake Beaver Dam (Sec. 62.38) .................................................
 239,307
Other waters (Sec. 62.38) .................................................
  99,392
     Total pounds marketed............................................................
1,381,168
 Revenue collected by the state .................................................$
11,128 .07
 Number of contracts entered into .................................................
 36
                  SURVEY OF TROUT STREAMS.
   For several years I have recommended a thorough survey or examina-
 tion of trout streams in the state, so as to secure positive information
as
 to whether or not the proper and necessary conditions exist to make the
 planting of trout successful. Many waters that at one time were excellent
 trout streams no longer have the proper natural conditions for the develop-
 ment and growth of this species of fish. The timber and brush have been
 cut from the banks, and the stream now meanders through farm and pasture
 lands, where, during the summer months, hogs and cattle wallow -in-the
waters. Rains, owing to the timber and brush being cut, cause a heavy
wash and flood. There is no question but that many thousands of trout
from the state hatcheries are plantedin streams in which the fish cannot
exist. What may have been a good trout stream a decade ago is to-day
nothing but a dirty, roily creek.
   This year we started the work of a survey covering Wisconsin trout
 streams. A complete investigation is made as to the present conditions,
 i. e., temperature of water, depth, width and length of the stream, food
 conditions, results of former plantings, or any information that may have
 a bearing on the subject.
   Many persons are of the opinion that water is all a fish needs. We may
 as well say that air is all a human being needs. A stream may be as pure
 and cool as spring water and as clear as crystal, if the necessary water
 vegetation which produces crustacea and caddis is absent, the planting
 of trout is useless. Crustacea is a form of animal life belonging to the
fresh
 water shrimp family. This food must be abundant in the waters or the
 young trout cannot survive as it is the only food on which a baby trout
 lives during the first few months of existence.
   The work was started in the southern part of the state and thus far ten
 counties have been covered. The survey is in charge of Mr. B. 0. Webster,
 foreman of the Delafield State Hatchery, who with one assistant traversed
 the country in an automobile. By placing additional men on the work we
 expect to complete the undertaking during 1917.
   After the work has been completed and statistics tabulated, the depart-
 ment will be able to arrange the future distribution of trout fry so that
the
 fish will be planted only in streams where we know they will find proper
 conditions for growth and reproduction. Hundreds of thousands of fry
 have been planted in streams in which a trout cannot survive. Many
 trout streams are now polluted with refuse from creameries, cheese and
 canning factories. This survey also covers the situation where persons


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