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Wisconsin. State Conservation Committee (1915-27) / Biennial report of the State Conservation Commission of Wisconsin for the years 1915 and 1916
(1916)

Ripple, R. L.
The use of gasoline in the treatment of fin trouble among brook trout,   pp. 34-37 PDF (746.8 KB)


Page 34


34         WISCONSIN CONSERVATION COMMISSION
THE USE OF GASOLINE IN THE TREATMENT OF
       FIN TROUBLE AMONG BROOK TROUT.
                         By B. L. RIPPLE.
  During the month of April at the Bayfield Hatchery, there developed
a certain fin trouble or disease among several thousand of our brook
trout yearlings, a disease with which all fish culturists have come in con-
tact with more or less. The quarters and conditions under which these
particular trout were kept and had wintered were ideal, except that the
space was somewhat limited and perhaps a little crowded. This fin trouble
or disease, if it should be called such, was, in my opinion, caused in some
way owing to said close quarters. Many thousands of trout of same age
and size, from same eggs and stock fish, were wintered in the same water
conditions, but with more ample space and with no bad results, and are a
grand lot of trout at this time. When this fin trouble was first noticed,
the very tips of the different fins, and tail as well, were slightly frayed,
reddish in color and inflamed, the dorsal fin being in all cases more badly
affected as the trouble advanced. The trout, although in the above sore
condition, never failed to eat and eat well up to the time they fell off
and
died. As stated above, the disease advanced more rapidly on the dorsal
fin and when this fin became affected down to the body of the fish, that
trout died. The strongest trout among this affected bunch seemed to
throw off the disease and become little the worse for it, except that the
dorsal fin would heal over and become only a short stub, the same being
true also with other fins and tail. At the first realization of this trouble,
I removed and started cleaning up all the affected fish by salt brining and
changing quarters, but I soon found that the old method of salting trout
was of no avail in this instance, but only hastened their death by keeping
the soreness inflamed.
  I had removed 500 or 600 of the very worst affected trout to one of the
hatchery tanks to prove to myself whether or not the salting operations
were really of no avail. Here the water could be drawn down at will and
different amounts of water and salt brine strength were tried, but the
trout fell off very rapidly. The disease had advanced at that time beyond
where any salting or cleaning up by that method, either in weak or strong
solution, would do any good. Several other things were tried and still
the trout died. Any one who loves his work and that which falls under
his personal care, as most hatchery men do, can appreciate the fact that
there was nothing left undone in trying to save my little bunch of "speckled
beauties." Commissioner Nevin visited the hatchery on Sunday at the
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