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Wester, Kevin J. (ed.) / Consumed by fire : a collection of writings about the famous Wisconsin Chair Company fire, Port Washington, Wisconsin, February 19, 1899
([1997])

Milwaukee Journal: Milwaukee, Wisconsin Tuesday, February 21, 1899,   pp. 62-63


Page 62

MIL WA UKEE JO URNAL
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1899
FIREMAN HACKETT DIES OF INJURIES
EXPIRES AT ST. MARY'S HOSPITAL AFTER A GREAT DEAL OF
SUFFERING.
HE WILL BE BURIED BY HIS COMRADES WITH THE USUAL
HONORS.
CAPT. LINEHAN WILL BE CONFINED TO HIS HOME FOR SOME
TIME.
Michael J. Hackett, pipeman of Engine company No. 4, who was injured at the
Port Washington fire early yesterday morning, died at 2:30 o'clock this morning at St.
Mary's hospital, whither he had been taken immediately upon being brought to
Milwaukee.
He retained consciousness almost to the time of his death and suffered greatly.
Hackett's injuries consisted of a lesion of the spinal cord and of a fracture at the
base of the skull. He was struck on the back near the neck, and below the neck, between
the shoulders, by the bricks from a falling chimney. The injury to the spine was of a
character which physicians at once pronounced must terminate fatally. The spinal cord
was so injured that there was a partial paralysis and the neck column was dislocated. In
addition, he had a number of bruises of a painful character in other places on his body.
Hackett was an unmarried men, 31 years of age, and lived at Sycamore and Fifth
streets. His nearest relatives in Milwaukee were two cousins---Dr. Jas. H. Hackett,
physician, and E. P. Hackett. Dr. Hackett went at once to Port Washington when he
heard of the accident and was assiduous in his attentions to the end, taking care of the
patient after his removal to St. Mary's hospital, and doing all that could possibly be done
for him.
Coroner Van Lare took charge of his body today and will hold an inquest,
probably tomorrow, He did not deem an autopsy necessary, as the nature of the injuries
was pretty well understood and there was no question as to how they were received.
The fire department has made no arrangements as to the funeral. No particulars
had been received from the immediate relatives of the deceased and no action was taken
because word was waited from them. If the body is interred at Milwaukee it will be
buried with due honors.
Capt. Linehan of No. 4 company, who was injured at the same time as Hackett
was reported as having passed a fairly comfortable night and to be getting along as well
as could be expected of a man as badly injured as he was. There is no belief that his


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