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Standard atlas of La Crosse County, Wisconsin: including a plat book of villages, cities and townships of the county, map of the state, United States and world: patrons directory directory, reference business directory and departments devoted to general information analysis of the system or U.S. land surveys, digets of the system of civil government, etc. etc.
(1906)

Preface,   p. [5]


Page [5]

PREFACE. 
N presenting the ILLUSTRATED HISTORICAL ATLAS OF WISCONSIN to the public,
it is not 
inappropriate to state that its preparation was commenced nearly three years
ago, with 
the confident belief that such a work would be of value and usefulness, and
be liberally 
patronized by the people of the State. The labor and expense of preparing
and publish- 
ing a work of this kind, and the difficulties attending the same, can be
comprehended 
only by those having experience in similar undertakings.  The course pursued,
however, 
has been to overcome all obstacles which would prevent fulfillment of the
original plan, 
and even to add new features at increased effort and cost, rather than to
save time and 
money by diminishing the value of any part of the work.   The constant aim
has been 
to make it a repository of useful and valuable information concerning the
great State of 
Wisconsin, that would merit the respect and confidence of the public.  It
is now  sub- 
mitted to its patrons with the hope that the unremitting care so long given
to its 
preparation may not prove to have been bestowed in vain. 
The plan of the work comprises more features than is practicable to enumerate
in 
detail; but they are mainly included under the following heads: 
I. A series of maps of the state, and of the counties separately; also, plats
of more 
than a hundred cities and villages, forming a complete Atlas of the state.
 Although 
a Wisconsin work, there have been also introduced a few general maps. 
II. Lithographic views of public buildings, institutions of learning, and
other views 
of an appropriate character. 
III. A portrait gallery, representing all the Governors of Wisconsin, both
state 
and territorial, a limited number of prominent pioneers, representative men,
and others 
identified with the interests of the state. 
IV. A general history of Wisconsin, from the earliest times to the present
date, in 
a concise form, suitable for the use and requirements of the general reader,
having been 
prepared with the care and accuracy which characterizes the author's previous
historical 
writings. 
V. Carefully -prepared articles on Special subjects, presenting  the Topography,
Geology, Climatology, Educational history, Agriculture, Railroads, Lumbering,
and other 
leading interests and resources of the state.  Also, a statement of its Health
Conditions, 
and a record of the acquirement and disposal of the public lands. 
VI. A local history and description of the state, by counties. 
VII. Biographical sketches of the Governors, and other prominent men, and
leading 
citizens. 
VIII. A complete Postal and Railway Guide- of the state, and table of reference.
IX. Statistical tables, embracing the census returns of 1875, Educational,
Agricul- 
tural, and other statistics. 
X. Patrons' Directory; also, Business Directory. 
The general plan and arrangement of the work, and the adaptation of the various
parts thereto, has been the special task of the publishers.  The preparation
of each 
part in accordance with the plan and method adopted, has been the work of
many. 
No one has been intrusted with any part of it, however, except those believed
to be 
especially qualified for the parts assigned them.  The names which appear
over the 
State History and the articles on special subjects are a sufficient guaranty
of the able 
and thorough manner in *hich those subjects have been treated.  They will
be recognized 
as men possessing not only eminent fitness for the work committed to them,
but, also, 
peculiar advantages for knowing whereof they write.  Nor has less care been
exercised 
in the employment of competent assistance in other departments of the work.
The maps of counties are based on the national surveys; those of cities and
villages, on official records.  In order to present correctly the various
features given 
in the separate county maps, additions and corrections were made by the aid
of engineers' 
plans and maps of the different railroad companies; by county and town records,
and by 
personal investigation of competent surveyors and draughtsmen, sent to nearly
every 
county for this purpose.   In many cases the assistance of local surveyors
was also 
obtained. While avoiding minor details which would tend to obscure or confuse,
care 
has been taken to present everything of material value in a work intended
partly for 
local and partly for general utility. 
In the preparation of the local history, the several counties have also been
visited, 
their records examined, and such sketches of early events as have been published
in the 
newspapers, or otherwise compiled, have been carefully examined; old settlers
have been 
visited, and every available means of information used.  From these elaborate
field -notes 
the local histories were prepared, an I afterward thoroughly revised at the
rooms of the 
State Historical Society, at Madison, from the materials there collected;
this revision, 
correction, and emendation being the work of several persons during the entire
summer 
of 1877.  In some of the counties, local men, specially qualified, assisted
in collecting 
and preparing the history of their own county, and in a 4ery few instances
such men 
have principally prepared the county sketch.   The Historical Atlas is therefore
not a 
hasty compilation, culled from  previous publications, but essentially an
original worR, 
obtained from official data, the preparation of which involved immense labor
and large 
expense.  If it shall secure the approbation of the public in some degree
commensurate 
with the effort of its production, and increase a knowledge of the state,
both at home 
and abroad, it will be gratifying to the publishers, and be some recompense,
even though 
there should be no appropriate pecuniary remuneration derived from the enterprise.
We take this opportunity to extend thanks to our Subscribers for their patronage,
and general interest manifested in the success of the work.  We also desire
to express 
our obligations to the Local Press, for the use of their files, and for the
kindly notices; 
to the County Offiicials in the different counties, for access to the Records;
to numerous 
Old Settlers, Local Surveyors and others, who have rendered assistance to
our men in the 
field; to the officers of the various railroads, for the use of their plats
in locating the 
different lines throughout the state.  We would especially mention Governor
Ludington; 
Hon. Peter Doyle, Secretary of State; Hon. Edward Searing, State Superintendent;
A. W. 
Potter, Esq, Chief Clerk in the Land Office, and their assistants, for the
willing and 
courteous aid rendered in obtaining information   from  their respective
offices.  Our 
special acknowledgments are also due to Dr. Lyman C. Draper, Secretary, and
Daniel S. 
Durrie, Librarian, of the State Historical Society, for the liberal help
afforded our histo- 
rians in securing the records and official data accessible in the society's
rooms at Madison. 
We also express our grateful acknowledgments to the Authors of the articles
on special 
subjects, for their courteous and active cobperation in our endeavors to
make this a 
representative work of Wisconsin. 
Doubtless, imperfections will appear which have escaped the scrutiny of those
most 
interested in avoiding the same; others may be ouui   ttributab4%al   the
imperfect 
records and means of information met with in some localities, or other diiuile
s,, d" 
which there were many in the way.    Some variance from  the commonly-received
state- 
ments may also be found in the State History and that of some of the older
counties. 
It should therefore be stated, in justice both to the authors and publishers,
that the best 
authority has been faithfully followed after long investigation.  These changes
have been 
introduced  only after a thorough examination of the early records available
in the 
Historical Rooms, at Madison.  Whatever may be the imperfections of the present
work, 
it is hoped it may also be found to possess some merits which will stand
the test of just 
and intelligent criticism. 
THE PUBLISHERS. 


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