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Dallas Centennial 1870-1970 : August 15-16, 1970
([1970?])

Telephone


FROM' HORSE AND BUGGY DAYS TO MODERN TELEPHONE SERVICE
On the present site of Chibardun Telephone Co-operative headquarters building there was
formerly a thriving business conducted by the Randall Brothers. Frank and Bert built the
livery barn about 1905. When salesmen and others came in on the train they needed a "rig"
and sometimes a driver to get them around. Knute Ellefson was in the business for awhile and
so was George Keller. Mr. Keller also had a barn across the street where he kept stallions.
His sons, Alec and Archie, helped with the livery service. Later Carl Espeseth bought out
the building and business and continued to run it even after the horseless carriage was invent-
ed. He continued as a dealer in farm and riding horses. One cold nght in the early thirties
the whole town was warmed and lighted by a fire which burned it to the ground.
ZTJ+Aonfi 0"-
James A. Anderson had the first telephone in
Dallas in his home, Ernie Babcock took it over
and established the first central office in the
hotel. Jule Anderson and Ole Lee were lineman.
The Farmer's Company started by Ole Berger
bought out the village system. There was a com-
pany to the north as well as the one out in
Sioux Creek which later combined. The office was
in the feed store run by Twain Pecore at one
time. Later it was upstairs in the Jorstad Store
building, which at that time was the Farmer's
Store. All this was before the "new" office build-
ing was built on the site of the present tele-
phone company. Joe Flacstad was lineman for many
years and familiar names on the board of di-
rectors were Ole Wall, Leon Jewett, John Randall,
Art Borgen, Art Hankin, Tracy Dowd, Ole Lee and
others.
The Central girls were social secretaries also.
If anyone was planning to be gone they left a
message with "Central" so she would know where
they could be reached. Some of these girls were:
Alma and Elsie Pecore, Ruby Parks, Ellen Huset,
Agnes Massie, Olga Severude, and many others.
There was twenty-four hour service. Line rings
for public announcements and fire alarms were an
important part of their duties.
With the progress of the communication in-
dustry it was too expensive for small companies
to modernize alone, so five small companies com-
bined to form the Chibardun Telephone Coopera-
tive. Dallas sold to the co-op in 1957. Joe Flag-
stad continued to work for the co-op until his re-
tirement. The Dallas representative on the board
of directors had been Art Berg, acting as Secre-
tary of the board. Because of its location, Dallas
was chosen as headquarters for the Co-op and a
garage for vehicles was built in 1959. The present
office building was built in 1965. Andrew Omtvedt
has been manager of Chibardun since it began in
1956. Present employees and Board Members are
listed in the Chibardun Telephone Co-op ad on the
back page of this book.


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